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Buche de Noel

Buche de Noel


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Countertop:

Separate the eggs, beat the egg whites with the salt and mix as for the meringue.

Mix the yolks with the oil as for mayonnaise, then with the sugar, milk, cocoa, flour, baking powder and finally add the mixed egg whites.

Pour the dough on the baking sheet in the cutter tray and bake until it passes the toothpick test (it doesn't take long).

Remove the top and place it with the baking sheet on a wet and squeezed towel and roll it (with the baking sheet). We will leave it to cool a bit and then we will open it easily without forcing.

Biscuit filling

In the meantime, I crushed the biscuits and mixed them with milk and butter, cocoa and sugar plus vanilla and rum. I put the filling in the middle of the baked sheet and I rolled the roll, then I cooled it.

When the roll cooled I prepared glaze.

I lightly heated the whipped cream and melted the chocolate in it, added the sugar and cooled it suddenly.

I then mixed the icing until it became cream (it takes a little longer, depending on the type of cream).

I put a layer of cream on the plate, then I placed the cake and decorated it with fir branches, decorative mushrooms and fir cones (after inspiration)


Ingredients

Mushrooms and Buttercream

Step 1

Preheat oven to 225 °. Whisk egg whites, sugar, cream of tartar, and salt in a large heatproof bowl set over a medium saucepan of simmering water (bowl should not touch water) until egg whites are very liquid (mixture will be warm to the touch) and sugar is dissolved (rub between your fingers to check), about 5 minutes. Remove bowl from heat and beat with an electric mixer until stiff, glossy peaks form (bowl will feel cool), about 5 minutes.

Step 2

Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper and dust very lightly with cocoa powder. Scoop out 1 cup meringue. Dollop heaping teaspoonfuls of meringue onto prepared baking sheet, spacing at least 1½ & quot apart.

Step 3

Lightly dust meringue with more cocoa powder and place a sheet of parchment over top. Use an offset spatula or your hands to flatten meringue into irregularly shaped disks about ⅛ & quot thick. Bake until lightly browned and parchment peels away easily, 75–90 minutes (meringue will be soft when it first comes out of the oven but will dry and crisp as it cools).

Step 4

Meanwhile, with mixer on medium speed, beat butter into remaining meringue, adding a piece at a time and waiting until incorporated before adding more. Beat until mixture is very smooth. (If it looks very loose or curdled, just keep beating buttercream will come back together.) Add vanilla extract and scrape in vanilla seeds beat to combine.

Step 5

Do Ahead: Mushrooms and buttercream can be made 2 days ahead. Store mushrooms airtight at room temperature. Cover and chill buttercream bring to room temperature, then beat until smooth before using.

Sponge Cake

Step 6

Increase oven to 400 °. Coat a 18x13 & quot rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray and line with parchment paper, leaving overhang on long sides. Spray parchment. Whisk flour, cornstarch, and ⅓ cup cocoa powder in a small bowl.

Step 7

Bring milk, butter, oil, vanilla, and salt to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Keep warm over low heat.

Step 8

Meanwhile, beat eggs and egg yolks with an electric mixer on medium speed until smooth. Increase speed to high beat until doubled in volume. With motor running, gradually add sugar beat until very light and fluffy and mixture falls back on itself in a slowly dissolving ribbon (it should be at least quadrupled in volume), about 5 minutes.

Step 9

Reduce speed to medium and gradually stream in milk mixture. Sift one-third of dry ingredients over top gently fold in until only a few streaks remain. Working in 2 additions, repeat with remaining dry ingredients, scraping bottom of bowl and using as few strokes as possible to keep eggs from deflating (a few streaks are fine). Scrape batter into prepared baking sheet and gently spread to edges of pan. Tap sheet lightly on counter to pop any large air bubbles.

Step 10

Bake cake until surface is puffed and springy to the touch, 10–12 minutes.

Step 11

Let cake cool in pan for 2 minutes, then run a knife along short edges to loosen. Invert onto a wire rack and carefully peel away parchment. Using a fine-mesh sieve, dust cake with cocoa powder. Cover with a large kitchen towel. Place another wire rack on top and flip cake over so towel side is underneath. Remove top rack dust exposed side with cocoa powder. Starting at one of the long sides, gently roll up warm cake inside towel. Let cake cool, seam side down, 30–35 minutes.

Step 12

Do Ahead: Cake can be baked 1 day ahead. Store tightly wrapped in plastic at room temperature.

Assembly

Step 13

Carefully unroll towel and cake on a flat surface (cake will curl at the ends and may have a few small cracks but should stay in 1 piece). Position cake so the end that was in innermost part of spiral is closest to you brush off any excess cocoa.

Step 14

Using a pastry brush, gently dab cocoa syrup over entire surface of cake you may not use it all. Dollop bittersweet ganache over top and smooth with an offset spatula to create an even layer.

Step 15

Dollop mascarpone filling over ganache carefully spread over surface, trying not to blend with ganache and avoiding last inch of cake along long side farthest from you.

Step 16

Using towel to lift edge nearest you, reroll cake, keeping towel on exterior. Chill, seam side down, until filling is set, about 30 minutes.

Step 17

Transfer filled cake to a baking sheet. Set aside ½ cup buttercream for attaching branches. Evenly spread remaining buttercream over cake with an offset spatula.

Step 18

Using a long serrated knife, trim ½ & quot of cake from each end to create clean edges discard (or eat!). Slice off a 4 & quot piece of cake. Starting 1 & quot from end, divide 4 & quot piece in half, cutting at a 45 ° angle, leaving 1 & quot at opposite end. Transfer log to a platter.

Step 19

Place angled side of each small piece of cake against roll to create branches, positioning one on top and the other on the side using a large dab of buttercream to secure. Cover any exposed cake on sides with more buttercream but leave cut ends exposed.

Step 20

Use spatula to create textured lines in buttercream to look like birch bark.

Step 21

Knead together marzipan and cocoa powder on a surface until smooth. Roll out on a sheet of parchment paper to less than ⅛ & quot thick, then cut out wavy strips to look like tree knots drape over buttercream and press gently to adhere.

Step 22

Using either a pastry bag fitted with a very small round tip or a disposable plastic bag with one corner snipped off, drizzle melted chocolate over log to mimic birch bark striations. Chill Christmas log, uncovered, until ready to serve.

Step 23

Just before serving, press mushrooms perpendicularly into logs in groups of 2 or 3.

Step 24

Do Ahead: Christmas log (without meringue mushrooms) can be assembled 1 day ahead. Wrap in plastic and chill. Attach mushrooms just before serving.

How would you rate Christmas log?

i will probably get nightmares about that buttercream, it completely broke twice and became a slimey mess i tried everything even the powdered sugar, everything else went great i just made a more simple buttercream for the top cause i was going to cry

BOY, did we hesitate before deciding to make this recipe for Christmas this year! The reviews had us hesitating for a little while, but my husband and I wanted to try our hand at something a little fancier for Christmas this year, so we decided to give it a shot. It was WORTH IT! You honestly can & # x27t expect this recipe to be quick and simple since it has 24 steps just on this page, without counting the recipes for the other components. We & # x27re average level home cooks with basic kitchen equipment and did pretty well, but we read the whole thing a couple times ahead and always double-checked while we were baking. We found the descriptions and times provided for each step pretty reliable. We made the recipes in two evenings: the first one, we prepared everything but the cake (buttercream, mascarpone filling, ganache, sirup and mushrooms). It took us around 2 hours. I was a little nervous because of the numerous comments saying people were almost in tears doing the buttercream and the mascarpone filling, so we followed every step very carefully and listened to the provided advice in the comments (room temp cream for the mascarpone, thicker mushrooms ). On my part, the buttercream actually went pretty smoothly, you just have to believe and keep beating until itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s all right. We didn & # x27t need to add powdered sugar. We made the sponge cake the second evening, plus the assembly and everything else (skipped the marzipan though) and it took us around 3 ½ hours. We did put a little less salt than recommended in the ganache and it tasted delicious, not salty at all. Maybe the people complaining about the salty taste didn't use kosher salt or a different kind of chocolate? All in all, a very delicious log that gave us a good challenge and good times spent baking together while the little one was asleep. Have faith, you can do this!

So, it LOOKS fine. Not great (my mother and I are by no means master patissiers), but it we had great success with our Thanksgiving pumpkin roll cake, and thought weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t give this a shot. Well, what a shot. We started at 11 on Christmas Eve morning, and just now finished at 7:30 PM the same day. The cake started out phenomenally. I accidentally turned off the oven, but once we got that started, the mushrooms worked like a dream, and we felt confident about our chances for the rest. Our bravado did not last long. We made the log with a different roll cake (mocha, rather than chocolate sponge), which did work. mostly. We also made the bark icing with little trouble, although it took 20 minutes of using our stand mixer on high to get the right consistency. Then came the issues. I had assumed that the meringue vanilla buttercream would be the filling, because our last roll cake had icing as filling. However, after we finished the icing, we spent about an hour running around to different grocery stores to pick up marzipan, bittersweet chocolate, espresso powder, and mascarpone. We got back, had a late lunch, and made the mascarpone filling, which turned out great. But we still hadnâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t read ahead enough to know that we were supposed to save half of it. The roll came out with a few cracks, but overall it was acceptable. We also made the chocolate syrup with no trouble, and were able to brush it on easily. Then came our the Trials. We made the ganache exactly as the recipe called for. Including a half teaspoon of salt. Why on EARTH this recipe called for SALT, of all things, in the chocolate ganache, I cannot fathom. It was AWFUL. But, we didnâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t taste enough of it to know how salty it was, until it was on the cake. At that point, we figured we should just carry on to the bitter end, and tell my father and cousin (the only people not involved in the creation who would be eating it) to avoid the ganache. The icing went on smoothly, and ended up looking exactly as the recipe said it should. Then we tried to give the yule log branches, as per the photo. The one on the side turned out okay, and we kept it. The one on top was a disaster. It looked like some kind of growth had sprung from the bark (and not in the way it was intended). It was wider than the log, and we were afraid it would fall off in two pieces on either side. We didn’t keep that one. Fortunately, we had enough leftover icing to cover the unfortunate blemish. The marzipan was fun to work with, and turned out great. The chocolate drizzle didn & # x27t quite work properly, as we didn & # x27t realize we & # x27d need proper icing equipment (even though the recipe called for it). To be fair, there wasnâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t really enough melted chocolate in our double boiler to have poured into a pastry bag for the drizzle. But, a thin plastic spatula sufficed (somewhat). Finally, the damn thing was done. Or so we thought. There was quite a bit of chocolate flavored marzipan left, and my mother had a brilliant idea for it. To show our feelings for the recipe, and for our own skills, we shaped what was left into a pile of turd, and placed it next to the cake on the platter. This cake will not become a yearly tradition in our family. In all seriousness, the recipes on here really do need a difficulty rating system. We would never have tried this if weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t known the level of experience required to have it turn out right.

Agree with KCWEI, a video would help greatly. And the butter cream! Mine did not work. Maybe I should add some powdered sugar like EBERG10 mentioned. The mushroom turned out great.

OK, this was my primary focus for two half days, but it was worth it !! The end result was just beautiful and people also thought it tasted great. I rated the whole thing 4 stars because some parts worked better than others. The cake rolled perfectly - something I & # x27ve had trouble with using other recipes the syrup adds a nice subtle flavor and I had no trouble with the mascarpone filling. I ended up using a different ganache recipe because, like a reviewer below, this one tasted salty and a bit off to me. My buttercream failed, but it was also sweeter than I wanted, so, I made a SECOND batch of the mascarpone filling and used that to frost the cake. I didn & # x27t get the same texture, but darn close. Nerdy stuff: From an arborist present at our Christmas Eve gathering I learned that the & quotmushrooms & quot are actually fungal conks. In addition to the fungal conks, I also made lichen. I added some matcha powder to the meringue and followed the same process as the & quotmushrooms & quot, but took them from the oven before they were fully firm. By luck, when I pulled the pieces apart they looked like lichen. Finally, I gently tore instead of cut the marzipan pieces to look more realistic.

When my Bûche de Noël cooking class got canceled, the friend who was going to take it with me and I decided we were going to make one anyway. We picked this recipe and it turned out great! Neither of us had made a sponge cake before, but we just followed the recipe and it turned out great. I loved the balance of flavors. That bittersweet ganache really balances out the sweetness of the swiss meringue buttercream. That one went to work a couple of days later to rave reviews and I & # x27m planning on another for family for the holidays. No one part was too difficult, just had to give it some time. It took us about 5 hours from start to finish.

If there were ever a recipe that needed videos, this was it. While I consider myself a relatively skilled home cook, there were many aspects of this recipe that just didn & # x27t work given the recipe & # x27s low level of detail. For example, I followed the directions to the letter and the marscapone cream failed twice. At this point I was halfway through the recipe, so even though my marscapone was far from & quotfluffy & quot, I just soldiered on. Also, the chocolate ganache was weirdly salty. Fortunately, the cake part worked fine and I was able to easily roll it in the towel. After assemply, my buche didn & # x27t look at all like the one photographed. My cake was a light brown, nowhere near as dark as the one photographed. I didnâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t even bother with the marzipan decorations although I did the mushrooms. Heeding the advice of a previous reviewer, I made mine a bit thicker and they stuck to the parchment, losing the cocoa striations. Disappointing, because I could tell this would have been a cool effect. Anyway, after all this effort and expense, this cake looked terrible, but it tasted OK. Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve glad I tried it in advance of the partyâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s baking for, because I wonâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t make it again. I think there are better recipes out there.

This recipe took all afternoon (and evening), gave me several challenges, but was SO WORTH IT! It doesn’t hurt that the more steps a recipe has, the more I enjoy making it. The buttercream almost had me in tears when it wouldn’t pull itself together, despite my meringue being perfectly glossy and beating it almost to death. But I was able to revive it with a little powdered sugar, then voila! Perfect, rich, creamy buttercream that would hold onto my cake! The mascarpone filling also taught me a lesson, the cream must also be room temperature when added. Otherwise you’ll get a curdled looking “mascarpone butter” which, despite being tasty, is not the goal. I popped it in the microwave for 15 seconds on 50% power and it whipped up nice and smooth! I’m bringing this cake to a NYE party tomorrow, and I know it will be a hit! I may even make this a tradition every year!

The recipe was very time consuming and difficult but the end result was worth it. THIS BUTTERCREAM IS FREAKIN INTENSE. The cake actually tastes better than it looks. The mushrooms (after you get the Meringue to set) are actually very easy and extremely realistic looking. My only complaint is to maybe give an estimate for the amount of time to allow the Ganache to cool. I did add a little powdered sugar to thicken the buttercream. This recipe was the highlight of this Christmas party

This is an amazing recipe! I made this on Christmas, and while it takes many hours for all the different components and chilling time, it is well worth it. The buttercream is, in my opinion, the best part. Make sure not to make your mushrooms too thin— I did, and they were very hard to remove from the parchment paper.


Photo Credit:

Preheat oven to 375 ° F. Line a heavy jelly-roll sheet pan (10x15-inch) with parchment paper or grease and floured foil. Make sure the parchment paper or foil sticks up at least an inch above the sides of the pan on all sides. You’ll use the parchment paper later to lift the cake out of the pan and roll it up.

In a large bowl, beat eggs on high speed until very thick and lemon-colored. (If eggs are not beaten enough, cake will be heavy and rubbery.) Gradually beat in sugar. On low speed, beat in water and vanilla.

Whisk the flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt together in a medium bowl and set aside.

Add dry ingredients to set ingredients gradually, beating just until smooth.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan so it’s spread evenly and and bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the top of the cake springs back when toughed and a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Remove the cake from the oven and immediately loosen the cake lift the cake out of the pan using the parchment paper and set onto the counter.

While the cake is hot, use the parchment paper the cake was baked in and start at the shorter end of the cake to slowly roll the cake up. Set the cake aside to cool completely, at least 30 minutes

When the cake has cooled and is ready to be filled, make the filling. See below instructions for filling.


Buche de Noel - Recipes

Happy New Year !! May 2015 be a peaceful year filled with lots of laughter, light hearts and good health !! We celebrated with a quiet dinner at home in front of the fire, a few noisemakers, an early bedtime for C and midnight hugs and kisses from Jimmy and Andrew. Perfect. (on the menu: smoked salmon + chive toasts to start, beef tenderloin, mustard roasted potatoes, arugula salad with herbs and my lemon vinaigrette, champagne and a Yule log cake! I completely forgot I had planned to make gruyere and thyme popovers too. Oops)

As I’ve mentioned before, I’m not one to make resolutions to kick off the year since I feel like each day brings opportunities to reflect on ways I can be a better mother, wife, friend, daughter, etc. Am I giving and showing love the best I can, am I creating a warm and happy home for my family, am I giving my time and energy to things that make a difference, are my expectations and goals both for myself and my family in check , am I present and available to my children when they need me, am I modeling patience and kindness even when it’s tough. These are things I pray for and I’m grateful for the fresh start each day brings, not just each January.

If you follow me on Instagram, you know that for New Year's Eve I attempted to make my Mum's Buche de Noel (her traditional Christmas Eve dessert) Why make it for New Year's when we just had it last week? Well, I've always wanted to try it and the boys love it, so I figured if I botched it up for New Year's Eve it wouldn't be such a big deal, Christmas on the other hand, well, I don't even want to think about it. :)

Thankfully, I didn’t botch it up (though my chocolate curls could use some practice) and was rather proud of my first attempt! I only wish I could have assembled it when it was still light out so that I'd have good photos to show you and do the cake its proper justice. Growing up, I looked forward to this dessert as much as I did the arrival of Santa. My Mum tops her with these small wooden angels she bought when we lived in Germany, which, now that I’ve proven myself worthy), are about to become mine. They will be among my most treasured items.

So, now for the recipe (s). This is not a difficult recipe (thanks to all my Mum's guidance and past experience), but it is time consuming and will result in a kitchen full of dirty dishes. Plan to order pizza or have dinner out the day you make this because you won't feel like cooking once you get everything cleaned up.

The Schedule:
2 Days Before (or up to 3 weeks): Make the meringue mushrooms
1 Day Before: Make the cake and filling, you can also make the marzipan pinecones + chocolate curls
Day Of: Sugar the rosemary sprigs + cranberries

Meringue Mushrooms:
4 large egg whites at room temperature
1/4 tsp cream of tartar
1 cup superfine sugar
2 tsp unsweetened cocoa
2 ounces semi-sweet chocolate

2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper
Pastry bag fitted with plain 1/2-inch tip

Combine egg whites and cream of tartar in the bowl of an electric mixer. Beat on medium, with the whisk attachment, until soft peaks form. Gradually sprinkle in sugar, beating at high speed until mixture is very stiff and dull looking.

Scrape mixture into a pastry bag. Pipe round, button shapes to make mushroom caps onto parchment lined baking sheets. Pipe pointed "kiss" shapes about 1 inch tall to make stems. Dust with cocoa. Bake two hours in 200 degree oven. (TIP: DO NOT use convection bake) After 2 hours, turn off the oven and leave the mushrooms inside for another hour until they're completely cooled.

Assemble the mushrooms: Place chocolate in microwave safe bowl and cook till almost melted. Stir with spoon until completely melted and smooth. Spread a little chocolate on the flat side of each meringue mushroom cap. Use a sharp knife to cut off and discard the pointed end of the meringue stems. Attach stem to cap while chocolate is still soft. Set assembled mushrooms aside until the chocolate has dried and caps and stems are glued together. They can be made up to 3 weeks ahead of time and stored in an air tight container at room temperature.

Chocolate Curls
I always liked how my Mum’s cake had the curls, rather than chocolate icing. I had never made these and with my first attempt I didn’t spread the chocolate thin enough so my curls were too thick and rather out of proportion. The second time I got busy making the potatoes and the chocolate had hardened too much. Good news is that no matter how they look they taste really good! I figure bark on a real log isn't perfect either. Just adds to the whimsy.

3 oz. fine quality bittersweet chocolate

Chop chocolate and melt in a small metal bowl over a saucepan with barely simmering water, heat until melted. With a metal spatula spread the melted chocolate onto a baking sheet (not non stick) as thinly and evenly as possible. Cool chocolate until firm to the touch, but not hard. With a metal pastry scraper held at an angle, scrape chocolate slowly from the sheet, letting it curl. Carefully transfer curls to a plate lined with parchment paper. Refrigerate, covered, until ready to use. Can be made 1 day in advance.

Sugared Rosemary Sprigs
Fresh rosemary
1 large egg white
1 TBS water
Granulated sugar

Combine egg and water. Using pastry brush apply to rosemary and then sprinkle all over, liberally, with sugar. Leave out at room temperature to dry completely. Takes about 3 hours. These are used just as a garnish on the serving platter. To create that magical forest look. We don't eat them or place them on the plates when serving the cake :)

Sugared Cranberries:
(these are optional, my Mum doesn't use them)
10 oz bag of cranberries
cranberry juice
child

Place cranberries in a colander in the sink, first rise with water, then pour cranberry juice over them to make them sticky, toss with lots of sugar and place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Then store in the fridge for at least an hour, up to a day, until ready to use. Again, these are just for decoration, though if you like really tart things, you could eat them.

Marzipan Pinecones
(optional, but they are delicious and fun to make)
Marzipan paste
Almond slices

Shape about a tablespoon size piece of marzipan into a pinecone shape. Make the bottom flat so it
stands on the counter. Starting on the bottom and working your way up, add almond slices. Store in airtight container at room temperature if making them a day in advance.

Recipe | Buche de Noel
cake ingredients:
6 egg whites
3/4 cup sugar
6 egg yolks
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Dash salt
Confectioners' sugar

filling ingredients:
1 1/2 cups heavy cream, chilled
1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
1/4 unsweetened cocoa
2 tsp instant coffee (I use instant espresso)
1 tsp vanilla extract

1. grease the bottom of a 15.5 x 10.5 x 1 inch jelly roll pan line with waxed or parchment paper grease lightly. Preheat the oven to 375. In a large bowl of an electric mixer beat egg whites at high speed until soft peaks form when the beater is slowly raised.

2. Add 1/4 cup sugar, 2 TBS at a time, beating until stiff peaks form when beater is slowly raised. In a clean bowl beat the egg yolks at high speed, adding remaining 1/2 cup sugar, 2 TBS at a time. Beat until mixture pale and very thick - about 4 minutes.

3. At low speed, beat into egg yolk mixture, cocoa, vanilla, and salt, just until smooth. With a wire whisk or rubber scraper using an under-and-over motion, gently fold the coca mixture into the beaten egg whites, just until they are blended (no egg white should show).

4. Spread evenly in pan. Bake 15 minutes, just until surface springs back when gently pressed with fingertip. Sift confectioners' sugar (VERY LIBERALLY) on a clean, linen dish towel (Tip: use a thick dish towel, without a pattern on it) Flip warm pan onto dish towel and gently lift off the pan. I laid the dish towel over a large wire cooling rack, not sure that was necessary but I felt like it helped. This is a bit of a tricky step just because it is awkward, I was afraid the cake would fall (er, fly?) Out and break. I didn't have any trouble though. Beginner's luck? After you've lifted the pan off the cake, remove the paper backing on the cake.

5. Roll up, jelly roll fashion, starting with the short end, towel and all. Cool completely on rack, seam side down - at least 1/2 hour. To make filling: Combine ingredients in medium bowl. Beat with electric mixer until very thick and then refrigerate.

6. Unroll cake: spread with filling to 1 inch from edge re-roll. Place seam side down on a serving platter cover loosely with foil. Refrigerate 1 hour before serving.

To serve:
Top cake with chocolate curls. Adorn platter with forest garnishes (rosemary sprigs, cranberries, mushrooms, and pinecones). Dust top of cake with confectioners sugar. Ohhh and ahhh, take pictures and then serve it up! :) Dip long knife in a glass of warm water before slicing each slice to make clean and pretty slices. And top each plate with a couple of meringue mushrooms.


How to Make the Perfect Christmas Log

For a purely joyous, bells-are-ringing holiday extravaganza, a Christmas log is simply unbeatable. Translated literally as & # 8220yule log, & # 8221 it & # 8217s a traditional French Christmas cake, but anyone can make or enjoy one. Though this treat might look like the territory of professional bakers (and you could certainly order one online ), it & # 8217s is actually fairly easy to make at home.

We reached out to bûche de Noël aficionado and baking pro Belle English, our test kitchen chef, who loves the recipe from our Favorite Cakescookbook. She & # 8217s made many renditions of the wintry classic over her years baking professionally and loves its stunning presentation. The cake is & # 8220mostly chocolate-based, but the combination of the whipped cream, the light fluffy taste and buttercream is really nice texturally, and has great balance, & # 8221 she says. Here are Belle & # 8217s top tips for rolling, garnishing and serving your Christmas log at its jaw-dropping finest.

1. Use the Right Recipe

For starters, be sure to use the best recipe you can find. Ours is available online as well as in our book , and Belle loves it because of its inclusion of buttermilk. The base cake, a Genoa , needs to be carefully rolled, and buttermilk lends it a lot of pliability, she says. It & # 8217ll make the whole affair a lot easier.

2. Get the Temperature Right

You likely know to let cakes cool completely before frosting them, but this one is a little different. Since you need to roll it into its signature log shape, the first time you roll it up, must & # 8220make sure the cake is slightly warm so it has give, & # 8221 says Belle. & # 8220Mastering that perfect temperature is crucial. & # 8221 (Think: about 16 to 20 minutes after you remove it from the oven.) For the next roll, once you & # 8217ve shellacked the whole cake with whipped cream, you want it to be & # 8220just barely warm, & # 8221 per the recipe . As Belle explains, & # 8220the warmth of the cake makes it a little more flexible if it & # 8217s completely dry, it will crumble. & # 8221

3. Use a Large Enough Tea Towel

& # 8220The big thing for me is to make sure the towel you use to roll the cake has a lot of extra space there, and is bigger than the sheet tray you baked the cake in, & # 8221 says Belle. & # 8220I remember the first time I made Christmas log I used just any old kitchen towel. There were pieces falling out everywhere, and it was kind of a mess. & # 8221 Literally make sure it can be contained, she suggests.

4. Don't Overdo the Whipped Cream

When it comes to the whipped cream you & # 8217ll spread on the unrolled & # 8220log, & # 8221 keep in mind that you should use the amount specified in the recipe, says Belle. & # 8220Too much and it’ll come spilling out, and too little it won’t fill up properly. That whipped cream acts an adhesive to hold the cake together in a roll, so it's important to spread it out in an even layer, too.

5. Use the Right Knife

Once you & # 8217ve made the & # 8220log, & # 8221 rolled it up, and frosted its & # 8220bark, & # 8221 you want it to slice well. Be sure to preserve its gorgeous appearance by using a serrated bread knife, suggests Belle. Doing so should result in a clean swirl of cake for each plate.

6. Don’t Fear Marzipan

The finishing touches on a bûche de Noël are a powder of “snow” and pretty little sylvan mushrooms and pinecones. And though the word “marzipan” may conjure unachievable creations sitting in high-end pastry shops, it’s actually a snap. “It’s easier than you’d think, and acts just like cookie dough,” says Belle. (She thinks it’s even easier to handle than cookie dough.) Better yet, it’s “very forgiving,” so if you want to flavor yours with a touch of peppermint or almond extract, you can.

So give our recipe a glance, as it includes every minute detail you might want to make your own Yule log this year. And take a moment to enjoy the admiration of loved ones who start calling you “the family pastry chef!”


How to Make the Perfect Bûche de Noël

For a purely joyous, bells-are-ringing holiday extravaganza, a bûche de Noël is simply unbeatable. Translated literally as “yule log,” it’s a traditional French Christmas cake, but anyone can make or enjoy one. Though this treat might look like the territory of professional bakers (and you could certainly order one online ), it’s actually fairly easy to make at home.

We reached out to bûche de Noël aficionado and baking pro Belle English, our test kitchen chef, who loves the recipe from our Favorite Cakescookbook. She’s made many renditions of the wintry classic over her years baking professionally and loves its stunning presentation. The cake is “mostly chocolate-based, but the combination of the whipped cream, the light fluffy taste and buttercream is really nice texturally, and has great balance,” she says. Here are Belle’s top tips for rolling, garnishing and serving your bûche de Noël at its jaw-dropping finest.

1. Use the Right Recipe

For starters, be sure to use the best recipe you can find. Ours is available online as well as in our book , and Belle loves it because of its inclusion of buttermilk. The base cake, a génoise , needs to be carefully rolled, and buttermilk lends it a lot of pliability, she says. It’ll make the whole affair a lot easier.

2. Get the Temperature Right

You likely know to let cakes cool completely before frosting them, but this one is a little different. Since you need to roll it into its signature log shape, the first time you roll it up, must “make sure the cake is slightly warm so it has give,” says Belle. “Mastering that perfect temperature is crucial.” (Think: about 16 to 20 minutes after you remove it from the oven.) For the next roll, once you’ve shellacked the whole cake with whipped cream, you want it to be “just barely warm,” per the recipe . As Belle explains, “the warmth of the cake makes it a little more flexible if it’s completely dry, it will crumble.”

3. Use a Large Enough Tea Towel

“The big thing for me is to make sure the towel you use to roll the cake has a lot of extra space there, and is bigger than the sheet tray you baked the cake in,” says Belle. “I remember the first time I made bûche de Noël I used just any old kitchen towel. There were pieces falling out everywhere, and it was kind of a mess.” Literally make sure it can be contained, she suggests.

4. Don’t Overdo the Whipped Cream

When it comes to the whipped cream you’ll spread on the unrolled “log,” keep in mind that you should use the amount specified in the recipe, says Belle. “Too much and it’ll come spilling out, and too little it won’t fill up properly. That whipped cream acts an adhesive to hold the cake together in a roll, so it’s important to spread it out in an even layer, too.

5. Use the Right Knife

Once you’ve made the “log,” rolled it up, and frosted its “bark,” you want it to slice well. Be sure to preserve its gorgeous appearance by using a serrated bread knife, suggests Belle. Doing so should result in a clean swirl of cake for each plate.

6. Don’t Fear Marzipan

The finishing touches on a bûche de Noël are a powder of “snow” and pretty little sylvan mushrooms and pinecones. And though the word “marzipan” may conjure unachievable creations sitting in high-end pastry shops, it’s actually a snap. “It’s easier than you’d think, and acts just like cookie dough,” says Belle. (She thinks it’s even easier to handle than cookie dough.) Better yet, it’s “very forgiving,” so if you want to flavor yours with a touch of peppermint or almond extract, you can.

So give our recipe a glance, as it includes every minute detail you might want to make your own Yule log this year. And take a moment to enjoy the admiration of loved ones who start calling you “the family pastry chef!”


Quel biscuit pour une bûche de Noël ?

Pour réaliser vos bûches en biscuit roulé, il y a plusieurs recettes. Voici 2 recettes de base : le traditionnel biscuit roulé, pour des bûches très faciles à réaliser ! On oublie la génoise compliquée et longue à réaliser avec ses œufs au bain-marie, je vous propose la recette de biscuit roulé de la famille, mais également une version de plus en plus à la mode “le biscuit japonais“, un biscuit pâte à chou qui donne un résultat différent mais tout aussi agréable !! Ce biscuit est moelleux mais surtout il ne casse pas.


1. Heat your oven to 220°C. Line the base and sides of a 23 x 33cm Swiss roll tin with a greaseproof paper and brush the paper lightly with oil.

2. Using an electric hand-held whisk, whisk the caster sugar and egg yolks together in a large bowl until creamy .

3. Put the chocolate and water into a heatproof bowl, set over a pan of gently simmering water and leave until melted and smooth. Let cool slightly, then fold into the whisked mixture .

4. Whisk the egg whites in a clean bowl until stiff but not dry. Gently fold a spoonful of the egg whites into the chocolate mixture to lighten it, then carefully fold in a remaining whites with a large metal spoon (use a gentle action and avoid overmixing). Pour the mixture gently into the prepared tin .

5. Bake for 12 – 14 minutes (no longer), until the sponge is risen and just firm to the touch. Place the tin on a wire rack and leave the sponge to cool for at least 2 hours .

6. Lay a sheet of greaseproof paper on a board. Once the sponge is cold, with one bold movement turn it out onto the paper, then lift off the tin. Carefully peel away the paper (picture 1) and trim off any scraggy edges .

7. For the raspberry cream filling, whip the cream until it holds soft peaks. Spread the inverted sponge with the whipped cream, scatter over the raspberries (picture 2) and sprinkle with a little Drambuie, if you like. Roll up from a long side towards you, using the paper to roll don’t worry about the cracks (picture 3). Transfer to a flat serving dish .

8. To make the chocolate buttercream, beat the butter until soft. Sift the icing sugar and cocoa together over the mixture, add the milk and mix to a soft icing. Carefully spread the icing over the cake and mark decoratively with the prongs of the fork. Chill until needed.

9. Sift some icing sugar over the log just before serving. Finish with some festive decorations if you like

Taken from Paul Hollywood’s How to Bake, published by Bloomsbury Photograph © Peter Cassidy


Bûche de Noël roulée traditionnelle au chocolat J'ai déjà plusieurs bûches de Noël élaborées sur le blog, alors pour changer et parce qu'on n'a pas toujours le temps, voici une recette de bûche super facile et rapide à préparer : la bûche roulée chocolat noisette ! La recette est aussi disponible en vidéo ici :) Le principe : on prépare un biscuit roulé en remplaçant une partie de la farine par de la poudre de noisette. On le recouvre de ganache au chocolat. On roule tout ça et on recouvre de ganache. Un jeu d'enfant ! Il vous faudra 15 minutes pour préparer cette bûche de Noël, et elle fera quand même un très bel effet ! Pour donner l'effet d'une vrai bûche en bois, j'ai coupé un morceau du gâteau roulé et je l'ai placé sur le dessus. J'ai ensuite ratissé ma ganache au chocolat avec une fourchette. Ça rend pas mal ! A la place de la ganache au chocolat, vous pouvez aussi mettre une pâte à tartiner maison, ce sera trop trop bon (mais un peu moins rapide à faire du coup). Retrouvez aussi les version de la bûche roulée framboise chocolat blanc ici ! Temps de préparation : 15 minutes / Temps de cuisson : 10 mn / Total : 25 mn 4 œufs 120 g de sucre 80 g de farine 40 g de poudre de noisette 250 g de chocolat noir 250 g de crème liquide (j'ai pris de la entière car c'est meilleur, mais ça marche aussi avec la légère) 50 g de beurre Vous pouvez visionner la recette de la bûche roulée facile en vidéo juste ici : Cliquez ici pour vous abonner à ma chaîne pâtisserie YouTube :) On commence par la ganache car il va falloir lui laisser le temps de refroidir et de durcir. Faites fondre le chocolat au micro-ondes ou au bain-marie. Parallèlement, faites chauffer la crème liquide. Versez la crème liquide sur le chocolat, en 3 fois, en mélangeant bien après chaque ajout. Ajoutez le beurre en morceaux et mélangez pour le faire fondre. Laissez refroidir et réservez au réfrigérateur en mélangeant de temps en temps. La ganache est prête quand elle a la consistance d'une pâte à tartiner. On passe au biscuit roulé. Préchauffez le four à 180°C. Séparez les blancs des jaunes. Fouettez les jaunes avec le sucre jusqu'à ce que le mélange blanchisse. Fouettez les blancs en neige et ajoutez-les à la préparation. Pour être sûr de ne pas les casser, ajoutez-les en 3 fois : d'abord une petite partie que vous allez un peu malmener pour détendre la pâte, ensuite le reste en deux fois en y allant plus doucement, toujours avec le fouet. N'hésitez pas à regarder la vidéo en cas de doute. Ajoutez ensuite la farine et la poudre de noisette tamisées (c'est important). Incorporez-les délicatement, encore une fois avec le fouet. Versez la pâte sur une plaque de cuisson rectangulaire , recouverte de papier cuisson. Lissez avec une spatule et enfournez 10 minutes. Je vous conseille de surveiller la cuisson de près car elle peut être variable selon les fours sur une si courte durée. Le biscuit est cuit quand il est coloré et que le dessus ne colle plus au doigt. Dès la sortie du four, retournez la plaque sur un torchon humide (j'ai passé le mien entièrement sous l'eau puis je l'ai bien essoré). C'est important car cela va vous permettre de rouler votre bûche sans casser le biscuit. Roulez tout de suite le gâteau dans le torchon et laissez refroidir une dizaine de minutes. Quand la ganache a bien refroidi, déroulez le biscuit et recouvrez-le de ganache. Roulez de nouveau le biscuit et coupez une extrémité sur 2 cm environ. Placez-la sur le dessus de la bûche. Recouvrez ensuite le tout de ganache au chocolat en vous aidant d'une spatule . Avec une fourchette, formez des stries afin de faire ressembler votre dessert le plus possible à une vraie bûche. Laissez au réfrigérateur au moins une heure avant de servir. Vous pouvez préparer la recette la veille, elle tient très bien ! J'ai ensuite décoré ma bûche avec du sucre glace, des petits cadeaux et des petites étoiles, mais à vous de voir selon ce dont vous disposez. Je n'ai pas réussi à trouver de petit Père Noël ou de petits sapins à planter dans la bûche, grrrr. C'est prêt ! C'est beaucoup plus facile et rapide qu'une bûche façon entremets, plus kitch aussi, mais aussi plus traditionnel et sympa je trouve :) Je vous souhaite un très joyeux Noël à tous car je ne vais plus rien poster d'ici là :) Alors amusez-vous bien et profitez de ceux que vous aimez ! Vous aimez mes recettes ? Retrouvez-les dans mes livres avec plein d'inédites ! Yule Log Cake Recipe – Buche de Noel

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Additional Info

A Buche de Noel yule log cake that is both low carb and gluten free. So delicious, holiday guests will never know it&rsquos a sugar free low carb dessert!

As I have been too busy the last few weeks to develop many recipes, I thought it would be nice to share a new recipe from one of my low carb blogger friends. Please join me in welcoming Elviira of Low Carb So Simple! Let&rsquos see how she created a gorgeous low carb Buche de Noel Yule Loge Cake for the holiday without cracking the cake roll.

French and French-Canadian people can hardly enjoy their Christmas without Buche de Noel, which is also called Yule Log in English. This traditional dessert is not only decorative, but it&rsquos also very delicious. Buche de Noel is like a frosted cake roll.

The original recipe was developed during the 19 th century. As with all traditional recipes, there are many variations of this special delicacy, the most common one is with yellow sponge cake and chocolate buttercream.

During my 10+ years of low-carbing, I really haven&rsquot seen any recipes for a low-carb version of Buche de Noel. It has always intrigued me how easy &ndash or difficult &ndash it would be to develop a low-carb version of Buche de Noel.

The cake roll part is the most challenging part: getting soft, yet firm enough cake that you can roll without cracking it.

After some trial and error, I ended up with a surprisingly simple recipe for chocolate cake. Psyllium guarantees the flexibility of the cake, so that it doesn&rsquot crack and break when you roll it. Separated eggs give volume and add softness to the cake. Coconut flour ensures you get the firm, cakelike texture.

For the filling, I&rsquove chosen a palatable mixture of instant (caffeine-free) coffee, whipped cream and mascarpone. The filling is like a mousse, and mascarpone gives it even more creaminess and stiffness. The filling is very simple but tasty, and with its mild coffee flavor, it complements the chocolate very well.

Instead of coffee granules, you can use ½ cup (120 ml) any sugar-free jam of your choice if you can stand the carbs. I made a version with sugar-free apricot jam, but since the jam is quite high in carbs, even though it&rsquos sugar-free, I ended up using coffee granules, which are practically carb-free.

You can naturally use fresh berries, like fresh raspberries or strawberries, if you can find some at this time of the year. Also, cranberries are low in carbs and perfect for the holiday season.

If you can&rsquot find mascarpone, you can replace it with full-fat cream cheese or just double the amount of whipped cream. In any case, I really recommend mascarpone: it&rsquos unbelievably rich and creamy, neutral tasting and makes a perfect mousse-like filling with whipped cream.

Moreover, the frosting uses cream cheese, so using cream cheese in the filling might be too repetitive, unless you are a real fan of cream cheese that is!

Because the dessert is quite heavy with all that cream and chocolate, I wanted to add some fruitiness to the frosting. In the end, the frosting is a delicious combination of chocolate and orange.

Orange gives fresh taste and goes perfectly with the creamy coffee-flavored filling. In my opinion, the taste resembles Café con Chocolate y Naranja. Orange itself is quite high in carbs, which is why I have used orange essential oil and freshly grated orange peel. Both give extremely elegant and complex orange flavors, practically without carbs.

This recipe is far more complex than I usually tend to create. Even though I prefer simple, healthy food that is quick to make, it&rsquos sometimes nice to challenge myself with a complicated classic masterpiece and how it can be made low-carb.

Since I post only very simple low-carb recipes to my blog, I thought this wonderful dessert would be a perfect guest post for my friend, Lisa. I admire her fantastic blog and the tasty recipes she makes.

Elviira is a former music scientist and computational linguist who is nowadays developing simple and healthy recipes with organic and natural ingredients and writing about ketogenic diet.

She has been studying nutrition, different diets and cooking for a few decades. On her journey from a strict raw vegan to a conscious omnivore, she has collected an extensive collection of hundreds of diet books and cookbooks, still relentlessly digging into new studies and old traditions.

Healing herself with gluten-free, sugar-free low-carb food, she is nowadays completely healthy and full of energy, developing and sharing simple and healthful recipes with mouthwatering photos on her blog Low-Carb, So Simple and sharing information how to naturally relieve anxiety on her new Curb Anxiety blog.

She hopes to help other people heal themselves and live healthy lives, full of energy and happiness. The Facebook page for the Low-Carb, So Simple blog has currently close to 440,000 followers and the blog thousands of daily visitors.

I&rsquom sure that you will agree Elviira&rsquos recipes are amazing. She works really hard to ensure all the recipes are simple and easy to make. All of them have five ingredients or less!

Elviira chose to share her Buche de Noel Yule Log Cake at Low Carb Yum since the recipe is too complicated to post on her own blog. It looks so delicious, as does all of her Low Carb So Simple recipes!