New recipes

Delaware Scrapple Dip


Scrapple is a blend of pork, cornmeal, flour and spices

Photo courtesy of McCormick

Scrapple finds a home in this creamy game day dip. Bake for 30 minutes and serve with assorted crackers or sliced French bread.

Recipe courtesy of McCormick

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon oil
  • 1/2 Pound (8 ounces) scrapple, sliced 1/4-inch thick
  • 2 packages (8 ounces each) whipped cream cheese
  • 1/2 Cup finely shredded white Cheddar cheese
  • 1 package OLD BAY® Classic Crab Cake Mix

Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Scrapple - Traditional

The original scrapple recipes were created to eliminate waste and use as much of the butchered animal as possible so original scrapple was made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other trimmings, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are removed, the meat is finely chopped and returned to meat broth in which the (dry) cornmeal or buckwheat flour is boiled to make a mush. Seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, black pepper, and others are added to broth. Buckwheat was very popular in Germany, Poland and Russia so it comes as not a surprise that the Pennsylvania Germans preferred buckwheat for thickening scrapple. Occasionally, cornmeal or regular flour was used instead of buckwheat, or sometimes combined with buckwheat.

MaterialsMetricUS
Pork head meat, pork feet, hearts, pork trimmings, liver 850 g 1.87 lb
Buckwheat or cornmeal flour 150 g 0.33 oz
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of materials
Salt 18 g 3 tsp
Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp
Allspice, ground 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Rubbed sage 1 tsp
Thyme, dried 1 tsp
Nutmeg 1.0 g 1/2 tsp
Cloves, ground 0.3 g 1/8 tsp
Instructions
  1. Place split pork heads in enough water to cover them and cook below the boiling point until meat separates easily from bones. Remove heads and place on a table to cool. Save meat stock. Remove the meat from the bones, the task is easily performed when the heads are still warm. Cover other meats with water and cook below the boiling point of water until done. Save meat stock.
  2. Chop all meats finely.
  3. Bring meat broth to a boil, add spices and start gradually adding the cornmeal, stirring constantly for the first 15 minutes, then reduce the heat and keep on cooking 15 minutes more until all is thorougly combined. The mixture should be thick enough to support a spoon standing on its own. If the mixture gets to thick, stir in more meat stock. Add all chopped meat and cook for an additional 15 minutes stirring occasionally.
  4. Line up shallow baking pans with waxed paper so that the ends extend over the long sides. Pour the mixture into the pans, allow to cool, cover with foil and place in refrigerator to set and become solid. Slice into 1/4 - 1/2” (6 -12 mm) slices and fry.
Notes

Scrapple is usually fried

Scrapple goes well with maple syrup.

Note: for even a better flavor soup greens can be added to water when boiling meat. Strain the stock before adding cornmeal. Although cooked scrapple has a form of a meat loaf, nevertheless, the manufacturing process resembles making a head cheese. That is why the recipe is included in this chapter.


Watch the video: What Is Scrapple? Food Tripping With Molly, Episode 6 (October 2021).