New recipes

VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance



With Oregon Cider Week and this weekends Cider Summit NW upon us it's a perfect time to drop this mini-doc "Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance". With a focus on the brand new, and soon to expand Cider Riot from Abram Goldman-Armstrong this 5 minute 24 second documentary is well worth your time.


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


VIDEO: Wild and Free: The Urban Cider Renaissance - Recipes

Fridge pickles are pickles that haven't been canned (either by water-bath canning or pressure canning). I don't know if I would try canning the knotweed, since canning involves boiling, and knotweed can get pretty mushy when boiled. These pickles can be stored in the fridge much like any open jar of pickles, for about two weeks--but I seriously doubt you will be able to keep yourself from eating them all in less than half that time!

Japanese knotweed is a tasty edible, but also an invasive species not native to this continent--one that crowds out local plants, threatening their survival. To learn more about how to identify and harvest, please check out my post, here.

Since fridge pickles don't need to go through a canning process, you don't need to use specific canning jars. Any glass jar (glass is non-reactive with vinegar) can be used. Consider recycling pickle jars, marinara jars, etc. Just make sure you store the jar in the fridge consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Tart & Sour Knotweed Pickles

Pickled stalks, now a dull olive color.
These are the ideal thickness for pickling

Garlic cloves
Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
Mustard seed
Japanese knotweed stalks
Black peppercorns
White peppercorns
Coriander seeds
Kosher salt

  1. Mince the garlic cloves, for a pint-sized jar, I used 2 large cloves of garlic. Place the minced garlic in the bottom of the jar.
  2. Add the mustard seed, coriander, black peppercorns and white peppercorns. For a pint-sized jar, I used about 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, a quarter teaspoon of coriander, and half a teaspoon of each pepper.
  3. Cut the knotweed into pieces to fit inside your jar, with about a 1/4 inch of space above. Add the stalks to the jar, on top of your spices
  4. Thinly slice the ginger. For 1 pint-sized jar I used 3 thin slices of ginger, from a root about 1" in diameter.
  5. Mix 1 part cider vinegar with one part water. The amount you need depends on the size and number of jars. Bring the vinegar/water mix to a boil, and add the ginger slices and a generous dash of kosher salt. Reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Pour the vinegar/water mixture into your jar, over the knotweed it's ok if the ginger slices fall in. Try to get complete coverage. Since these are not going to be canned, you don't have to worry about air bubbles so much.
  7. Seal and allow to come to room temperature before refrigerating. Allow to sit for at least 24 hours before sampling, 48 hours for improved flavor. Store in the fridge, and consume all the contents within 2 weeks.

Hot & Sour Knotweed Pickles
Based on the tart & sour recipe, these pickles add a bit of heat


Watch the video: renaissance anthems 2002 cd2 at the club (December 2021).