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Bites Over Break: Miami


Miami’s reputation as a food haven is no secret. Hungry visitors flock to Prime 112, Yardbird, The Bazaar and Joe’s Stone Crab to dine in style and see the South Beach scene. But when I visit Miami, I have a slightly different strategy. My favorite bites come from small spots praised by locals and lesser known to tourists —the types of places you’d go if you actually lived in Miami. The best bite yet comes in the form of a Venezuelan specialty from a cozy cafe called European Corner that doesn’t sell European fare at all. The slight trickery is part of the charm.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

While its name would certainly suggest European inspired food, this corner cafe is serving up traditional Venezuelan cuisine. My friend who happens to be Venezuelan and from Miami took me here and revealed to me what I’ll hold as a true gem of my travels, a place I’d have totally missed otherwise. We feasted on arepas, traditional Venezuelan sandwiches, held together by two corn based patties and filled with a variety of stuffings. The winner was stuffed with shredded braised meat and a mountain of grated salty white cheese. The arepa itself fronted a fluffy interior and a slight crisp initial bite. A side of alfajores, simple sugar cookies sandwiching a smear of dulce de leche, are a necessary accompaniment. The cookies were buttery, slightly crumbly and deep in caramel flavor —Spring break certainly does taste sweet.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

The post Bites Over Break: Miami originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.


See Miami Through the Eyes of Award-Winning Chef Michelle Bernstein

When you think of Miami, what do you think of? A place to catch some rays with a frosty beverage in your hand and miles of sandy beaches at your feet? A place where salsa dance beats and international flavors create a tangible energy and sizzling nightlife scene? This is the Miami you see in the movies and hear about in songs. This is the Miami that everyone knows.

But Miami is so much more than this — especially when it comes to food. Go ahead and have that frozen piña colada, but don’t stop there. There’s a whole world of cuisines out there, from the Latin fusion bites that chef Eileen Andrade is cooking up in West Kendall to kosher babka, made in a spare industrial space in the Wynwood Arts District.

And it’s impossible to talk about food and Miami in the same conversation and not think of chef Michelle Bernstein. The James Beard Award winner, author, and Miami native has garnered wide acclaim for her simple yet flavorful approach and has pretty much become a household name over the years.

She still keeps busy in the kitchen with her café, Crumb on Parchment, in the Miami Design District, which she runs with her husband and business partner, David Martinez, and she’s also the host of local Channel 10’s SoFlo Taste and the Emmy award-winning series Check, Please! South Florida on PBS. In other words, she’s an expert on South Florida cuisine and an obvious choice to share everything there is to love about Miami.

My husband and I moved to the Upper East Side of Miami 12 years ago when we were ready to open our first restaurant of our own. The houses in this part of Miami definitely have more of a modern architectural vibe, and the streets are filled with contemporary retailers and great little individually owned restaurants, but it is still incredibly convenient: We are eight minutes from the airport and six minutes from Miami Beach.

We found a perfect space that was affordable and easy to renovate and it became Michys. And the very same week we found a home for our restaurant, we found a home for ourselves that was literally a five-minute bike ride from Michys. It’s a little 1930s house with sliding glass doors, flowering fruit trees, and peace — something you really look forward to when you’re in the restaurant business! And best of all, our son, Zach, can ride around the neighborhood picking flowers for his collection without getting yelled at on a daily basis.

But this is just one little corner.

A quick drive through bustling downtown shows off the remarkable design of the Freedom Tower, our Ellis Island of the South. Just a couple blocks away is our new Perez Art Museum Miami — its landscape so modern and breathtaking, you almost don’t even have to walk inside to see the artwork, as what you’ll witness outdoors will leave you busy for hours on end. Even the waterfront restaurant Verde under the hanging plants is an experience.

For me, downtown is the center sweet spot of our city — especially Wynwood, just five minutes northwest. A few years ago, the great late Tony Goldman, whom I considered a dear friend, created the Wynwood Walls, an urban park filled with murals by artists from around the world, and had the foresight to develop much of the area.

It has become a haven for art-adoring pedestrians, international travelers, and, best of all, families — we love taking our son for ice cream, walks, and a glance at his favorite flower wall. Zak the Baker opened his doors and changed the way the whole city looked at and ate bread and Middle Eastern food as we knew it. And when Chef Brad Kilgore opened Alter, he truly opened our minds to a whole new cuisine experienced through his eyes and palate.

But while Wynwood is awesome, please don’t miss a place that has what I consider the hottest vibe, sounds, culture, and beat. We locals call it La Sawesera, Calle Ocho, or Little Havana, and you just can’t help dancing, smiling, and gawking. Domino Park is the center of it all where you’ll find locals playing domino and chess, but don’t speak, don’t ask, and please don’t break their concentration — trust me!

Since before I could reach the counter, I’ve been eating at Little Havana’s La Camaronera Seafood Joint & Fish Market. Those fried shrimp are the best in the world — dip them in tartar sauce and their special habanero sauce and oh man! And make sure you try their minuta sandwiches — little filets of yellowtail fried to absolute perfection between soft Cuban sandwich rolls with onions, ketchup, and who knows what else, but honestly you won’t care after one bite.