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Rustic Onion Tart


Ingredients

  • 1 recipe for butter sour cream pastry dough* or 1 packaged, flat pie crust (Trader Joe's has one in their frozen section)
  • 3 medium sized red and/or yellow onions (enough for 5 to 8 cups, sliced)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • Salt
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped, or 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 3/4 cup (not packed) roughly grated Gruyère Swiss cheese

*Sour cream pastry dough:

  • 1 1/4 cup (160 g) all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 5 ounces of butter (1 1/4 sticks, 10 Tbsp, 137g), cubed
  • 1/4 cup sour cream

Method

1 Prepare the dough: If you are making a crust from scratch, prepare the dough and let it chill in the refrigerator while you are cooking the onions.

To prepare the dough, whisk the flour and salt together in a large bowl. Cut the butter into the flour with your hands or with a pastry cutter, until the mixture resembles a coarse meal.

Add the sour cream and use a fork to incorporate it into the dough. Gather the dough into a ball and shape it into a disk. Wrap it with plastic wrap and chill for at least an hour.

2 Peel and slice the onions, lengthwise from stem to root. (See How to Slice an Onion)

3 Caramelize the onions: Heat olive oil and butter in a large, heavy-bottomed sauté pan on medium heat. Once the butter has melted, add the onions and sprinkle a little salt over them.

Cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, until the onions have softened and are translucent.

Reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an additional 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are well browned.

Add balsamic vinegar and cook for 10 minutes more, until onions are completely caramelized. Remove from heat.

4 Roll out the dough: Preheat the oven to 450°F. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and let stand for 5 minutes before rolling it out.

Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 13-inch diameter. Transfer the crust dough to a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

5 Layer the cheese and onions onto the dough: Place all but a couple tablespoons of the cheese in the center of the dough. Spread to within 1 1/2 inches from the edges. Add the caramelized onions, layering them on top of the cheese. Sprinkle with thyme.

6 Pleat the edges: Fold the edges of the crust dough over so that a small circle of onion is still showing in the centre of the tart. Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top of the tart.

7 Bake: Place in the oven on the middle rack. Bake for 10 minutes at 450°F. Reduce the heat to 350°F and bake for an additional 20-25 minutes, until the crust is golden brown.

Remove from oven and let sit for 10 minutes before serving.

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Rustic Potato and Caramelized Onion Tart

I have a thing for caramelized onions, if you couldn’t tell. Also, I bought my weight in onions with my last Costco trip.

Note to self: stop shopping hungry!

This rustic tart is perfect for brunch or a light dinner, served alongside a crisp green salad. You know what I love about the word rustic? It is a completely endearing way to describe “imperfect”. This tart didn’t adopt “rustic” into its name until my lame attempt at rolling out the dough produced something shaped more like Canada than a circle.

To me, rustic things are made with love, from a well-worn recipe, in a warm home, by a person with weathered hands and flour on their cheek.

This recipe for pastry produces pie dough, perfected. The lard and butter in equal proportions creates a flaky, tender cust with rich, buttery flavour. I have honestly never made better. Try it, if not for this tart, for something sticky-sweet and juicy, like apples or blueberries.

Are you somewhere cold and snowy? Here is something to cheer you up: the first whisper of spring.


Rustic Onion Tart - Recipes

After months of “winter,” the colder weather is finally here and for some, it is a very hard time of the year. The shorter days and the sharp cold can cause all of us to feel a little down. Of course, the isolation of the pandemic is making this even worse. I know for myself, I hate the shorter days because I just can’t seem to adjust my schedule.

We can do all our chores during the morning hours, but once 4:00 pm rolls around and the sun starts to set, we feel like the day has ended. It seems that as soon as I’ve gotten up in the morning, it is time to make dinner. It is not uncommon to feel fatigued, sad, and all around tired. We can find it hard to find the motivation to exercise, go for walks, or even go out at all, because of the cold.

You wake up and it is dark, and as you do your work or chores, find yourself working until dark as well. I think that January is a particularly difficult time, because the holidays have ended and we tend to isolate more and miss getting together with people as well. Our holidays this past year have been reduced to having just immediate family and we have missed seeing our extended family, which makes the post-holiday blues even worse.

There are some things we can do to make ourselves feel better. Try to minimize the time you spend watching the news. It will make you less stressed and anxious. Focus more on a movie or show that will give you a good laugh. Watch what you eat. According to Very Well Mind, foods high in Vitamin D such as fish oil, milk, orange juice, and yogurt can help to balance your mood.

Get your sleep schedule on the right track. Going to bed at the same time and getting up at the same time will stabilize both your mood and your schedule. Try, and I know this is hard, to do some kind of physical activity, such as yoga, weight training, or some kind of aerobic exercise during the day. Bundle up and take a walk. I know that when I go out for a run or walk, I am cold for a short period of time, but then I warm up and begin to actually enjoy being out. Break up your goals and do them in small increments. Eventually you will see that working up to your goal is much easier than you think.

Or, like me, you can cook. I find it very therapeutic to chop vegetables and follow a recipe through. I feel like I have accomplished something, although I really do hate the cleanup after a meal. But as I clean, I find that doing it in an orderly way can be quite cathartic.

Even better, you can make this delicious tart. Who does not love caramelized onions? This may take you a good bit of time to do, but it is so worth it. If you do not want to make the dough, find some store bought dough like I did, and it will still be wonderful. After you brown up the onions, it is then flavored with balsamic vinegar and thyme, giving this tart a nice savory and tangy flavor. The addition of the cheese adds gooey, cheesy goodness. This tart is worth every minute you put into it, and may just make your day that much better.

This recipe is courtesy of SimplyRecipes and will serve 4 people who will love to relax with this warm and savory winter tart.

Ingredients for Rustic Onion Tart:

1 recipe for butter sour cream pastry dough* or 1 packaged, flat pie crust
3 medium sized red and/or yellow onions (enough for 5 to 8 cups, sliced)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
Salt
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped, or 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
3/4 cup (not packed) roughly grated Gruyère Swiss cheese

For the Sour Cream Pastry Dough:

1 1/4 cup (160 g) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
5 ounces of butter (1 1/4 sticks), cubed
1/4 cup sour cream

If you are making the dough:

I admit I bought store made dough and it was still fantastic. If you want to make the dough from scratch, here are the directions:

If you are making a crust from scratch, prepare the dough and let it chill in the refrigerator while you are cooking the onions.

To prepare the dough, whisk the flour and salt together in a large bowl.

Cut the butter into the flour with your hands or with a pastry cutter, until the mixture resembles a coarse meal.

Add the sour cream and use a fork to incorporate it into the dough.

Gather the dough into a ball and shape it into a disk.

Wrap it with plastic wrap and chill for at least an hour.

Peel and slice the onions, lengthwise from stem to root.

Heat olive oil and butter in a large, heavy-bottomed sauté pan on medium heat.

Once the butter has melted, add the onions and sprinkle a little salt over them.

Cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, until the onions have softened and are translucent.

Reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an additional 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are well browned.

Add balsamic vinegar and cook for 10 minutes more, until onions are completely caramelized. Remove from heat.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator and let stand for 5 minutes before rolling it out.

Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 13-inch diameter.

Transfer the crust dough to a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Layer the cheese and onions onto the dough:

Place all but a couple tablespoons of the cheese in the center of the dough.

Spread to within 1 1/2 inches from the edges.

Add the caramelized onions, layering them on top of the cheese.

Fold the edges of the crust dough over so that a small circle of onion is still showing in the centre of the tart.

Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top of the tart.

Place in the oven on the middle rack.

Bake for 10 minutes at 450°F.

Reduce the heat to 350°F and bake for an additional 20-25 minutes, until the crust is golden brown.


French Onion Tart | Rustic Caramelised Onion Tart Recipe

It’s true: happiness comes from simple things, and is found when you least expect it. Just like this free-form french onion tart. Get ready for a slice of happiness!

You won’t even need a tart pan— a baking tray will do just fine it’s a rustic caramelised onion tart recipe, you see. As for the ingredients, I’m sure they are already in your larder as they were in mine. And soon enough, with minimal effort (cutting up onions is the only hard work you’ll have to do) you’ll have before you an aromatic fetching golden yellow french onion tart that is simple remarkable.

All the flavours perform a staccato rhythm on your tongue, making it do a jig really — and instantly revealing that this is a phenomenal combination of flavours. The saltiness and the nuttiness in the cheese combine with the smoky tartness and sweetness of the onions — and when this soft, lightly crunchy and cheesy filling comes wrapped in a lovely light and buttery pastry, the textures take the sensation to a higher level.

The simplicity of this french onion tart does not prepare you or the complexity of the flavours. And when you’re caught up in that moment, you realise that you are happy. Happy to be savouring a simple yet truly remarkable french onion tart at home.

You can make the quick flaky pastry ahead of time or the previous night and keep it in the fridge. You could also make the filling and keep it in the fridge the previous night. The next day, you can just roll the quick flaky pastry out and assemble the filling and bake the tart.

This recipe calls for Cheddar cheese, bit if the taste is too strong for you, you can use Gruyère instead. It won’t take away from the aroma and the taste it’ll only make the nutty flavour milder.

This french onion tart — that I’ve adapted this recipe from Easy Cooking | Baking — makes for a pretty filling brunch or great party food. Your guests will definitely not believe you when you list out the ingredients. Inexpensive, comforting, and great (especially when eaten the next day).

Well, what are you waiting for? Let’s go get a slice of happiness. And do let me know how it went by commenting below, or tagging me on Facebook with @notjustspice or using the hashgtag #notjustspice on Instagram.


Rustic Onion Tart - Recipes

Cornmeal Herb Pastry

Place flour, cornmeal, herbs and salt in the bowl of a food processor and pulse a couple of times to blend. Add butter and pulse a few times until the mixture looks like crumbs. Add water through the chute while the food processor is running, and blend just until the mixture comes together like dough. Be careful not to overblend.

Sift a tiny bit of flour out onto the counter and turn the dough out onto it. Knead gently just enough to bring it all together well—up to 1 minute—and flatten into a disk. Wrap in plastic or parchment paper and refrigerate until use. Dough can be made 3 days ahead, and even freezes well for up to a month.

Onion Filling

Melt butter over medium heat in an iron skillet or other heavy pan. Add onions and salt and sauté over low heat for 15–20 minutes, stirring frequently. The onions should turn a light golden color, but should not become mushy—they should still hold their shape. Remove from heat and set aside.

Dust a large baking sheet with cornmeal (for a free-form crust) or grease a heavy baking dish (for the lattice crust).

For the free-form crust

On a sheet of lightly floured waxed paper, roll the pastry dough into an oblong almost as wide as the paper and about 14 inches long. Invert the pastry onto the prepared baking sheet. Distribute the cooked onions over the pastry, leaving a 2-inch border all around. Fold the edges up over the filling—they will crack and buckle just lay the pieces over each other. Grind black pepper over the surface of the tart.

Bake the tart for 15 minutes, then pull it out and spoon half of the cream over the tart. Bake for 15 minutes more, then spoon over the remaining cream and sprinkle the cheese on top. Bake for 20 minutes more, until the tart is bubbly and brown. Allow to cool on the pan for 5 minutes, then slice and serve. This tart tastes wonderful at room temperature, and is even better the next day, but it hardly ever lasts that long!

For the lattice-topped tart

On a sheet of lightly floured waxed paper, roll out ⅔ of the dough. Line the bottom and sides of the baking dish with dough. Place cooked onions evenly over the dough. Spread cheese over the onions. Roll out the remaining dough and cut into strips weave these over the top of the dish. Pinch the ends of the lattice strips into the side of the crust. Bake for 15 minutes, then pull out and drizzle half of the cream into the openings in the lattice. Return to the oven for 15 minutes, then remove and drizzle the remaining cream into the tart. Return to the oven for a final 20 minutes. Serve as described above.


Rustic Onion Tart

1 Pâte Brisée (tart dough) for one 10-inch tart (see method for making pâte brisée) or 1 packaged, flat pie crust (Trader Joe's has one in their frozen section)
3 medium sized red onions
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp butter
Salt
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
3/4 cup (not packed) roughly grated Gruyère Swiss cheese

Directions

1 If you are making a crust from scratch, prepare the dough and let it chill in the refrigerator while you are cooking the onions.

2 Peel and slice the onions.

3 Heat olive oil and butter in a large, heavy-bottomed sauté pan on medium heat. Once the butter has melted, add the onions and sprinkle a little salt over them. Cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, until the onions have softened and are translucent. Reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an additional 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are well browned. Add balsamic vinegar and cook for 10 minutes more, until onions are completely caramelized. Remove from heat.

4 Preheat the oven to 450°F. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and let stand for 5 minutes before rolling it out. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 10-inch diameter. Remove the crust dough to a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

5 Place all but a couple tablespoons of the cheese in the center of the dough. Spread to within 1 1/2 inches from the edges. Add the caramelized onions, layering them on top of the cheese. Fold the edges of the crust dough over so that a small circle of onion is still showing in the centre of the tart. Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top of the tart.

6 Place in the oven on the middle rack. Bake for 10 minutes at 450°F. Reduce the heat to 350°F and bake for an additional 20-25 minutes, until the crust is golden brown. Remove from oven and let sit for 10 minutes before serving.

Questions, Comments & Reviews

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Savory Rustic Tart Dough Recipe

Easy, make-ahead, absolutely delicious. I swear, you no longer have to be afraid of pastry dough—of making it, rolling it out, shaping it—any of that. Yes, you’ll need a food processor (my favorite tool for making pizza dough, too), but oh, will you be happy with this ultra-buttery flaky crust.

The one thing you should keep in mind when making this dough is timing. It really works best to make the dough ahead. While it only takes 10 minutes to make, the dough needs to rest and chill in the fridge for at least an hour (and up to 2 days), and then, after taking it out of the fridge, it will need to warm back up to “cool” room temperature*, which will take about 45 to 55 minutes. So it’s a great idea to make the dough some morning or evening when you have just a few spare minutes. Pop it in the fridge and then when you’re ready to make a tart, you’ll only need to set aside the time it takes to warm it back up—and that’s the perfect amount of time to make your filling. It’s also really a joy to be able to reach in and grab that little wrapped present of dough already made up. (The dough will also keep in the freezer for 3 or 4 weeks.)

Makes enough dough for two 8- to 9-inch Rustic Tarts.

2 cups (9 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour

1/2 pound (16 Tbsp.) very cold unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

In the bowl of a food processor, combine the flour and salt. Pulse briefly to combine.

Add the cubes of butter. Pulse quickly about 20 times, or until the butter particles are quite small (like tiny pebbles). With the motor running, add the ice water in a steady stream. (This will take about 10 seconds). Stop the motor. Then pulse quickly six or eight times—just until the mixture begins to come off the sides of the bowl and clump together. The mixture will still be somewhat loose and crumbly—that’s okay. You will bring the dough together in the next step.

Turn the mixture out into a big mixing bowl and knead it briefly against the sides of the bowl to finish bringing it together into a dough. (Once you have incorporated all of the crumbs, knead once or twice to smooth out the dough just a bit. While you don’t want to over-handle the dough, you also don’t want to be afraid to handle it as much as you need to in order to bring all the bits of the dough together, as it will ultimately be easier to roll out.)

Divide the dough in half. (If you have a scale, you can weigh the dough pieces to make sure they’re of equal or close-to-equal weight. They should each weigh about 9 1/2 oz.)

Shape each piece into a disk about 1-inch thick (and about 4 inches across). (Again, don’t be afraid to handle the disk just enough to smooth out cracks and make a tidy disk.) Dust lightly with flour, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to two days. (You will need to remove the dough from the fridge 45 minutes before rolling it.)

Alternatively, you can freeze the dough for up to a month. Defrost it in the fridge overnight before using.

*NOTE: Depending on how long your dough disk has been refrigerated, it will most likely be between 50 and 42 degrees when you take it out. Anything in this range is rock hard. You’re looking for the dough to warm up to about 60 degrees. Don’t worry, you don’t have to take its temperature—it will be ready when it is still slightly cool but somewhat pliable. Again, depending on the temperature the dough was chilled to, and the temperature of your kitchen, this will take anywhere from 40 to 60 minutes—leaving 45 or so minutes is a good bet, but also don’t worry if you get behind. There is a decent window of time, and on all but the hottest of days (or kitchens), it can usually sit for up to 30 minutes more before it gets too warm.


Vermouth-Laced Rustic Onion Tart

Vermouth was one of the spirits I learned to avoid as a teenager sneaking hooch out of my dad’s liquor cabinet. The floral-infused sweet flavor did not appeal. A fortified wine (a wine in which a distilled spirit, such as brandy, is added) infused with botanicals, vermouth is offered in a range of flavors, from subtle to obtusely herbaceous and sweet.

Like wine, sweet or dry vermouth adds flavor to dishes, introducing bitter or honeyed qualities alongside floral notes and spices that chefs use in both sweet and savory iterations. Somewhat confusing to newcomers, vermouth is typically offered in “sweet” (red) or “dry” (white) and the two should not be used interchangeably in recipes. Sweet vermouth is, as billed, sweeter and likely the less offensive of the two – most will find a sip of sweet vermouth over ice is quite pleasing. White vermouth, however, is more dry and botanical, an acquired taste in the glass.

Traditionally, vermouth was drunk as an aperitif and used as medicinal elixirs. In more recent years, vermouths took center stage as the perfect foil to vodka and gin during the late ‘90s martini craze. History has a way of repeating itself and today, what’s old is new and we’re back to sipping vermouth.

This approachable tart — made with rustic and rough dough that is meant to fall apart — takes its savory onion filling and pairs it with soft, vermouth-soaked raisins piled high in the center. A stinky cheese is a lovely addition, helping to cut through the sweetness of the onion mixture. Feel free to sip the Ransom Spirits dry vermouth alongside.

Rustic Onion Tart
Makes 1 tart, serves 4

DOUGH
¾ cup all-purpose flour
½ cup whole wheat pastry flour
1 teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1 egg, beaten
1 teaspoon cold water

FILLING
½ cup raisins
¼ cup Ransom Spirits dry vermouth
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound (4-5 medium-sized) onions, sliced
¼ cup chopped fresh thyme
Pinch of salt
2 ounces soft goat cheese

To make the dough, combine the flours, sugar and salt in a medium-sized mixing bowl or a food processor. Add the pieces of butter and work in with your fingers, pinching the flour into the butter until small crumbs, like sand, are formed.

When the butter is well incorporated, add the egg and water, mixing until just coming together. Turn the dough out on a counter and knead gently, three to six times, to combine and push the dough together into a ball. It will be quite crumbly and uneven. Shape into a disc and flatten out. Cover well with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour.

While the dough is chilling, put the raisins in a small bowl and add the vermouth. Set aside.

To make the filling, set the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat in a medium-sized saucepan. Once the butter has melted, add the onions, thyme and pinch of salt. Cook and stir continuously, until the onions are starting to brown and the pan has gone dry. Once the onions are cooked through and browned, add the raisins, along with their liquid. Stir, scraping the bottom of the pan, and cook until most of the liquid has evaporated, about two minutes. The onions can be syrupy but should not be watery. Once the mixture is thick and jam-like, remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

Preheat the oven to 350° F. When the dough has chilled properly, remove it from the fridge and set it on the countertop. Layer the disc of dough between two long pieces of plastic wrap so they are perpendicular to each other in the shape of a wide cross, with the dough securely in the center. Starting from the center and working out, roll out the dough to form a 10-inch circle, flipping over occasionally.

Once the tart crust is shaped, remove the top layer of plastic wrap and flip the delicate dough onto a sheet pan or cookie sheet, centering it as best you can.

Remove the plastic wrap and pile the onions into the center of the tart, leaving a 2-inch edge of tart dough. Dot on dollops of goat cheese. From there, fold the tart dough on top of the onions, creating a pentagon-shaped tart with an opening in the center. Put the tart in the oven and bake for 30 to 40 minutes, until the tart shell is golden brown and crispy. Remove from the oven and let cool 10 minutes before serving in wedges.


Caramelized Vidalia Onion Tart

On a lightly floured surface, roll dough to a 12-inch circle. Press into bottom and up sides of a 10-inch removable-bottom tart pan. Prick all over with a fork.

Bake for 6 minutes. Let cool completely. Reduce oven temperature to 350°.

In a large skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 20 minutes. Uncover and increase heat to medium-high. Cook, stirring frequently, until onion is lightly browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in vinegar, and cook for 2 minutes.

Remove from heat, and stir in cream cheese, goat cheese, and 1 cup Gruyère until melted and smooth. Stir in egg yolks, thyme salt, and pepper. Spread mixture into prepared crust.

Bake for 25 minutes. Sprinkle with remaining 1/2 cup Gruyère, and bake 5 minutes more. Let cool on a wire rack for 15 minutes. Remove from pan, and serve warm.


Rustic Bacon and Onion Tart

There’s nothing about this tart that isn’t wonderful. To make it, I simply poured some popover batter into a baking dish, and covered it with crisp bacon and sweetly-caramelized onion. As the tart bakes, the crust puffs up and surrounds the sumptuous filling. Are you drooling yet? Here’s the easy step-by-step:

First, grab 6 strips of bacon, and turn them into matchsticks, or what the French call “lardons.” To do this, make a stack of 3 bacon strips…And cut the stack crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide pieces. Do the same with the remaining 3 strips of bacon, and set aside.

Then peel 2 medium-size onions…

Toss the bacon lardons into a skillet, and saute over medium heat until crisp — about 10 minutes.

With the help of a slotted spoon, scoop the crisp lardons onto paper towels to drain.

Then, while clutching your pearls, tip the bacon fat (every last drop of it!) into a 9吇 baking dish.

Do you adorn yourself in pearls when you cook? I certainly do. I shuffle around in 3-inch heels, too. June Cleaver’s got nuthin’ on me.

But we are not here to discuss my kitchen attire, no matter how stylish it may be. Our mission today is a sexy savory tart!

Melt some unsalted (and preferably homemade) butter in the hot skillet…

And add the sliced onions. Let them cook until soft and slightly caramelized — about 10 minutes. Remove from heat, and set aside.

This next step is easy indeed: center the oven rack, and preheat the oven to 425°F.

Then tip 1 1/2 cups of all-purpose (a/k/a “plain”) flour into a pale blue bowl…

And add 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper.

Also add 1 tablespoon dry mustard…

And 1 generous teaspoon dried thyme leaves.

Violently whisk these dry ingredients together.

In another bowl, whisk together 1 1/4 cups cold milk and 3 large eggs.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry, and whisk until you achieve a smooth batter.

No picture of these next steps: Pop the baking dish into the preheated oven for 10 minutes, and let the batter rest for 10 minutes.

Working quickly now, tip the batter into the hot baking dish…

Sprinkle on the crisp bacon lardons…

And the caramelized onions.

Return the dish to the oven, and bake until the batter puffs and browns — about 30 minutes.

As you can see, the crust will practically puff itself out of the baking dish. This is an invitation to unmold the tart.

Remembering the dish is red-hot (so use oven mitts to protect your fingers), slide the tart onto a wooden board.

Cut one small square from the tart, and present it to your dear friend Brenda for taste-testing. Watch Brenda have a mouth orgasm as she bites through the crackling crust, and follows through to the crisp bacon and sweetly-caramelized onions.

If you’re like me, you’ll hog the rest of the tart for yourself. It’s delicious with a side of Cabernet Sauvignon.

If you’re not like me, you can serve the tart as a main course for dinner, along with some salad greens and the obligatory red wine. Or, just cut the tart into small squares, and serve them for chic appetizers during a cocktail party. Yes — this is a multi-occasion tart!

In any event, please let me know if you’ll give this sumptuousness a try. Again, it’s a breeze to make. And it’s screamingly delicious to eat.


Rustic pumpkin, ricotta and caramelised onion tart recipe

The delicious partnership of roasted pumpkin, ricotta and caramelised onion makes this a great summer tart to take to a picnic in the park. It will only take moments to assemble once you have made the pizza dough and filling.

You may have excess pizza dough. This can be wrapped and refrigerated for later use.

Ingredients

  • 750 g plain flour
  • 40 g dried yeast
  • 0.25 tsp caster sugar
  • 0.25 tsp salt
  • 400 ml tepid water
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 26.5 oz plain flour
  • 1.4 oz dried yeast
  • 0.25 tsp caster sugar
  • 0.25 tsp salt
  • 14.1 fl oz tepid water
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 26.5 oz plain flour
  • 1.4 oz dried yeast
  • 0.25 tsp caster sugar
  • 0.25 tsp salt
  • 1.7 cups tepid water
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 large red or brown onions, thinly sliced
  • 0.25 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 large red or brown onions, thinly sliced
  • 0.25 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 large red or brown onions, thinly sliced
  • 0.25 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 750 g pumpkin, seeded, peeled and chopped into 3cm pieces
  • 250 g English spinach
  • 1 kg fresh ricotta cheese
  • 25 g grated parmesan
  • 2 eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten
  • 26.5 oz pumpkin, seeded, peeled and chopped into 3cm pieces
  • 8.8 oz English spinach
  • 2.2 lbs fresh ricotta cheese
  • 0.9 oz grated parmesan
  • 2 eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten
  • 26.5 oz pumpkin, seeded, peeled and chopped into 3cm pieces
  • 8.8 oz English spinach
  • 2.2 lbs fresh ricotta cheese
  • 0.9 oz grated parmesan
  • 2 eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten

Details

  • Cuisine: Australian
  • Recipe Type: Main
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Preparation Time: 30 mins
  • Cooking Time: 70 mins
  • Serves: 8

Step-by-step

  1. First, make the dough. Place the flour, dried yeast, sugar and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment. Add the tepid water and oil and mix on low speed until combined. Knead the dough at this speed for approximately 5 minutes or until smooth and elastic.
  2. Remove the bowl from the mixer, cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm place until the dough doubles in size, approximately 30 minutes.
  3. Remove the dough from the bowl and place on a lightly floured surface. Knead for 30 seconds until the dough is its original size. Shape the dough into a ball, and press lightly to flatten.
  4. Now make the caramelised onions. Heat the oil in a large deep frying pan over low heat. Add the onions and salt and cook for 15–20 minutes until softened. Stir frequently to prevent them from browning.
  5. When the onion is cooked and lightly golden, stir in the sugar and vinegar. Continue to cook over low heat for a further 5–10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until sticky and caramelised.
  6. Now do the rest. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking tin with baking paper. Toss in the pumpkin cubes with enough oil to lightly coat. Roast for 20 minutes or until tender. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.
  7. Sauté the spinach in a frying pan over high heat for 1–2 minutes until wilted, leave to cool, then use your hands to squeeze dry.
  8. In a large bowl combine the ricotta, parmesan, eggs and salt and pepper. Fold through the pumpkin, spinach and 125g of the caramelised onions.
  9. Line a baking tray with baking paper. On a lightly floured surface, roll out enough pizza dough so that you have a base 40cm round and 5mm thick.
  10. Transfer the rolled dough to the prepared tray. Spread the ricotta mix over the pizza dough leaving a 5cm border. Gather the edge of the dough and drape back over the filling to create a ruffled look.
  11. Bake for 40–45 minutes or until the crust is golden brown. Drizzle with olive oil and serve. This is delicious served hot or at room temperature.

The Cook + Baker by Cherie Bevan and Tass Tauroa (Murdoch Books, £20.00). Photography by Chris Chen.

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