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Steak au poivre (French fillet steak with green pepper) recipe


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  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Beef
  • Cuts of beef
  • Steak
  • Fillet steak

When I want to make something special for a candlelight dinner for my boyfriend, this is what I make, I just made it again for Valentine's Day. Very easy and delicious.

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 1 knob ghee
  • 2 thick mature fillet steaks
  • 1 jigger cognas
  • 1/2 (300g) tub crème fraiche
  • salt
  • 3 tablespoons jarred green peppercorns in brine, drained

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:15min

  1. Heat ghee in a frying pan.
  2. Sear steaks over high heat and fry to taste medium or rate. Remove from pan and keep warm.
  3. Deglaze pan with cognac, add creme fraiche and simmer till thickened.
  4. Crush peppercorns a little and add to sauce. Season with salt. Return steaks to pan and reheat quick. Serve immediately.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)


  • 4 (6- to 8-ounce 170 to 225g) boneless medallion steaks, such as filet mignon
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 ounce (30g) whole black peppercorns, plus more as needed, divided
  • 3 tablespoons (45ml) vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon (15g) unsalted butter
  • 2 thyme sprigs
  • 1 medium clove garlic
  • 1/2 large shallot (about 1 1/2 ounces 40g), minced
  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) brandy or cognac
  • 3/4 cup (175ml) homemade chicken stock or store-bought low-sodium chicken broth
  • 3/4 cup (175ml) heavy cream or 6 tablespoons (90ml) crème fraîche (see note)
  • 1 teaspoon (5ml) Dijon mustard

Season steaks all over with kosher salt. Set on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet and allow to air-dry, uncovered, in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, crack peppercorns into rough halves and quarters. You can use a pepper mill set to its coarsest setting (though not all pepper mills will crack coarsely enough) a mortar and pestle (though some peppercorns will jump out as you try to crush them) or, perhaps best, a large mallet, meat pounder, or skillet to crush them (wrap the peppercorns in a clean kitchen towel first to contain them).

Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Spread cracked peppercorns on a plate or in another shallow dish and firmly press one side of each steak into the pepper to encrust it in an even layer. Set each steak aside, peppercorn side up. Reserve any remaining cracked peppercorns. (Exactly how much pepper adheres will depend on the dimensions of the steaks. You should have some pepper remaining, but if not, you can crack more to completely coat one side of each steak.)

In a large stainless steel or cast iron skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add steaks, peppercorn side down, and cook until peppercorns are well toasted, about 3 minutes. Carefully turn steaks, trying not to break the peppercorn crust. Add butter, thyme, and garlic and cook, basting steaks with a spoon, until steaks are well seared on the second side. Remove from heat.

Transfer steaks to a rimmed baking sheet. Using an instant-read thermometer, check the internal temperature of the steaks if they've reached 125°F (52°C), they're ready to be served medium-rare. If they haven't reached their final doneness temperature (which will depend heavily on the dimensions of the steaks), transfer to oven and continue cooking until the correct internal temperature is reached. Either way, allow steaks to rest for 5 minutes once the final doneness temperature is reached.

Pour off all but 1 tablespoon of fat from skillet and discard garlic and thyme. Add shallot and any reserved cracked peppercorns, return to medium heat, and cook, stirring, until shallot is tender, about 2 minutes.

Add brandy or cognac. (To prevent an unexpected flare-up if working over gas, you can turn off the burner, add the alcohol, then reignite the burner.) Cook until raw alcohol smell has burned off and brandy has almost completely evaporated.

Add chicken stock and bring to a simmer, stirring and scraping up any browned bits. Whisk in cream or crème fraîche, then simmer, stirring often, until sauce has reduced enough to glaze a spoon. Whisk in mustard. Season with salt.

Arrange steaks on plates and pour sauce on top. Serve with French fries, mashed potatoes, or other sides of your liking.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns, or more to taste
  • 2 (6 ounce) (1 1/4-inch-thick) tenderloin steaks
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot
  • 2 tablespoons cognac
  • 2 tablespoons red wine
  • ¼ cup beef broth
  • 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream

Crack peppercorns in a mortar or pestle or with a rolling pin. Press cracked peppercorns into the steaks.

Heat butter in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add steaks cook, turning with tongs, until browned, about 2 minutes per side. Reduce heat to medium and cook steaks, turning often, until they begin to firm up and are hot and slightly pink in the center, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer steaks to a plate and cover to keep warm.

Stir shallot into the skillet. Pour in cognac and red wine simmer, stirring constantly, until reduced, about 2 minutes. Pour in beef broth and simmer, scraping browned bits off the bottom of the skillet, until sauce is smooth, about 2 minutes. Stir in cream cook until heated through, 1 to 2 minutes.


Related Video

Heavenly!! Just do yourself a favor and Make! This! Dish!! Don’t have to change a thing.

Very easy to make.Tip:Measure out with water the REDUCED amount,then use the end of a kitchen implement makes with a band of masking tape to show where you should end up That way,you're not pouring and guessing and dirtying bowls. This needs deeper beef flavor-maybe add a dollop of demi-glacé,or reduce more broth.Added some flour to the butter mixture in pan prior to the cream,which helped with consistency. Needed salt too,but I can work with this recipe.

The sauce taste is spot on and delicious. I made it exactly as written with store bought beef broth and dried green peppercorns I added to the broth while reducing. It thickened slightly, but not to the degree I like (steakhouse sauce is often quite thick) so I made a quick roux with 2T of butter and flour and whisked the sauce into that. I might use a true demi glace instead of reduced stock next time to get a darker color and flavor, but everything else about the recipe is great.

The flavor with all of the ingredients were delicious. The only thing that I did not do was to cook the steaks in the butter. I had a bit of leftover ribeye steak that I reheated in the butter. I followed everything else exactly as written. I felt like this sauce was way too thin and would have preferred a thicker sauce. It came out like water but had a great flavor. I used brandy and not cognac. I would make it again, I just would have to figure out a way to thicken it.

This was fabulous & easy. Used Dartangan veal demiglace instead of stock & it was perfection.

This is for kitchensal701. The steaks need to rest for 5-10 minites after cooking. Either in 120F oven, or on warmed plates with a cover (any pot or pan cover will do. Resting a little longer is no problem. Use tis time to make the sauce and incorporate drippings from the pan-fried steaks (or not if you're grilling). It will come together fine. Just be sure to have everything for tbe sauce pre-measured and handy. Have fun:-)

I'm going to grill filets for guests this week, and plan to try the peppercorn sauce. I'm nervous about the steaks being done before the sauce. I don't like to stress over things not coming together in a timely way. My question: can this sauce be made perhaps an hour or two BEFORE the guests arrive or before the steaks are done, then reheated? Reviewers commented that left over sauce was used the next day and was just as good! Please respond. Thanks.

DEVINE. Have tried so many recipes for this sauce but my search is over. Loved it, will never try another recipe. Followed exactly except I had no shallots.

Used dry crushed peppercorns and shallots instead of onions. Was decadent and delicious. Boiled for longer than I would have expected (5- 7 minutes) to get my desired consistency.

Easy to make. Used coffee cream and dry green peppercorns instead. Still came out great. Softened the peppercorns in the beef broth reduction. Very tasty!

Sauce was the bomb and easy to make. Highly recommend this!

good sauce--sauteed 1/4 c onion, added 1 c. beef broth[Bovril]--reduced to

1/2 cup--added 1 cup heavy cream--reduced x 10 mins til thickened--added 1 T brown gravy mix mixed with 2-3 T water--thickened nicely--added 1-2 T green peppercorns. Very good!!

The best pepper corn sauce - and very easy. Really don't need to change anything about it. If you are going to make this with the pan fried steaks - a nice touch is to flame it with a healthy dose of cognac or brandy for the final minute or so.

YUMMY. THe green peppercorns were a bit hard to find but SO worth it. This is great. I froze the extra sauce and served it over a roasted prok tenderloin later. It was even better the second time. bitterendive.blogspot.com

This sauce was very good. This sauce, minus green peppercorns, is usually served with a black peppercorn crusted filet for steak Au Poivre. Note that if your using a low sodium or acutal beef or veal stock, you will have to add some salt to finish.

delicious, but almost too rich for us. We made pepper crusted the steaks for added kick. YUM.. next time, I'll switch out the garlic mashed potatoes (another recipe from this site) for something a bit lighter

Although the sauce did not thicken as much as I would have liked it to it is absolutely delicious. I have also frozen the leftover sauce and have used it again and it was still delicious

We made this for a second time this year for Christmas Eve. Big impact for very little work. Like another reviewer, we started with good quality demi-glace rather than reduced beef stock. Made all the difference in time.

YUUUUUMMMY. this is SOOO GOOD and EASY!

Wow - so easy, fast and shows gourmet. My sauce thickened beautifully - and surprisingly, given the other reviews. And given other reviews, I tweaked the process a little: grilled lamb in butter in cast iron pan, removed lamb for another meal, added shallots & butter for two minutes, added broth and reduced on high for maybe 7 minutes. Nearly boiled down to a syrup before I caught it, it was so fast. Keeping it hot, I added cognac & peppercorns, then heavy cream. It's so thick and delicious! Great for our Bordeaux dinner tonight.

This was very good, however I added one and a half tbsp of beef demi-glace (I doubled the recipe) and it made all the difference! Served over a Chateaubriand with roasted rosemary potatoes. yummmy!

Pretty Darn Good! 2 Tbl spoon peppercorn a bit much for me (and I love pepper). Suggestions: Deglaze the pan with the Cognac for a few seconds. Worked time magic by reducing the broth to 1/4c rather then 3/4c as called for. which shaved down the boil time to thicken sauce.. Mine only took 15 Mins!

My husband has great faith in my ability to replicate his favourite restaurant dishes! This recipe hit the mark. To better release the green peppercorn flavour, I mash some of them in my mortar and pestle before adding. Marsala is my usual substitute for cognac--just what I have on hand.

Great sauce, but takes forever to thicken! Use heavy whipping cream, it helps, but I'm not completely sure I've ever been able to let it thicken as much as it should be. It's a game of patience I guess.

Make sure you taste this before adding any seasoning. I found it to be incredibly salty. Try and use low sodium broth if possible.


The Classic French Chateaubriand

The meaning of the French term chateaubriand can be confusing. Depending on whom you ask, it can either refer to a cut of steak or the method of roasting a beef tenderloin. Despite this confusion, rest assured that when you order a chateaubriand from a French restaurant menu, you will receive a beautiful center-cut piece of beef tenderloin (usually enough to serve two), along with a classic red wine sauce.

Beef tenderloin is one of the most expensive pieces of beef but for a good reason. The cut lives up to its name, providing the most naturally tender, succulent piece of beef available. Note that a filet mignon, another pricey steakhouse cut, is the skinny part of the beef tenderloin.

This chateaubriand recipe is a traditional version of the restaurant favorite. The lusciously tender beef is seasoned very simply, roasted to perfection, and then sliced on the diagonal. Be sure to make the easy shallot and wine sauce to accompany the meat and serve with chateau potatoes for authenticity. Chateaubriand is a perfect roast for the French Christmas table.


Recipe Summary

  • ¼ cup coarsely crushed black peppercorns
  • 4 (6 ounce) 1 1/2 inch thick filet mignon steaks
  • salt to taste
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • ⅓ cup beef broth
  • 1 cup heavy cream

Place the peppercorns into a shallow bowl. Sprinkle the beef tenderloin filets with salt on both sides, and coat both sides with crushed peppercorns.

Melt the butter with the olive oil over high heat in a heavy skillet (not nonstick) until the foam disappears from the butter. Gently place the steaks in the pan, and cook until they start to become firm and are reddish-pink and juicy in the center, about 3 1/2 minutes per side. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read 130 degrees F (54 degrees C). Remove the steaks to platter, and cover tightly with foil.

Pour the beef broth into the skillet, and use a whisk to stir the broth and scrape up any dissolved brown flavor bits from the skillet. Whisk in the cream, and simmer the sauce until it's reduced and thickened, 6 to 7 minutes. Place the steaks back in the skillet, turn to coat with sauce, and serve with the remaining sauce.


Steak Au Poivre

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

Steak Au Poivre is a classic French steak recipe for juicy, peppery beef tenderloin and rich pan sauce made of heavy cream, cognac, and cracked peppercorns.

If you’ve tried our Ribeye Steak, you know that a perfect steak can easily be made in a cast iron skillet! This steak recipe is a classic yet fancy Dinner anyone can master.

STEAK AU POIVRE

This classic, French dish is a fancy dinner for two similar to Steak Diane but simpler to make. The Au Poivre sauce is made with just peppercorns, heavy cream, and cognac, and the peppery berries balance the rich cut of beef. Steak Au Poivre is made with more expensive cut filet mignon and is perfect for special, intimate occasions like a loved one’s birthday or Valentine’s Day.

Steak Au Pouivre isn’t a meal you make in bulk or throw into the oven or crockpot, but it’s also a lot easier than the name suggests. In fact, Au Poivre simply means served with a lot of pepper and that exactly describes this dish with it’s thick peppercorn crust and more peppercorn in the sauce! There are some key points in this post to help you make Steak Au Poivre like a pro, but the main skills you need are patience and preparation.

This dish combines two classic cooking techniques that home cooks can easily master with a little prep and guidance. The first technique is sautéing steak on the stovetop, for a crispy crust and tender medium rare inside. The second part is creating a quick pan sauce with the browned bits and a few other ingredients. Unlike a gravy or roux, this sauce is thickened with fat from the meat instead of flour or cornstarch, so it’s extra rich and luscious.

Turn Steak Au Poivre into a romantic steakhouse dinner with side dishes like Morton’s Creamed Spinach and Mashed Potatoes. Another classic side for this steak dinner is Pommes Frites, also known as Shoestring French Fries. They are light and crispy, with just the right amount of oil, and perfect for dipping in leftover Au Poivre sauce.


Steak Au Poivre

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

Steak Au Poivre is a classic French steak recipe for juicy, peppery beef tenderloin and rich pan sauce made of heavy cream, cognac, and cracked peppercorns.

If you’ve tried our Ribeye Steak, you know that a perfect steak can easily be made in a cast iron skillet! This steak recipe is a classic yet fancy Dinner anyone can master.

STEAK AU POIVRE

This classic, French dish is a fancy dinner for two similar to Steak Diane but simpler to make. The Au Poivre sauce is made with just peppercorns, heavy cream, and cognac, and the peppery berries balance the rich cut of beef. Steak Au Poivre is made with more expensive cut filet mignon and is perfect for special, intimate occasions like a loved one’s birthday or Valentine’s Day.

Steak Au Pouivre isn’t a meal you make in bulk or throw into the oven or crockpot, but it’s also a lot easier than the name suggests. In fact, Au Poivre simply means served with a lot of pepper and that exactly describes this dish with it’s thick peppercorn crust and more peppercorn in the sauce! There are some key points in this post to help you make Steak Au Poivre like a pro, but the main skills you need are patience and preparation.

This dish combines two classic cooking techniques that home cooks can easily master with a little prep and guidance. The first technique is sautéing steak on the stovetop, for a crispy crust and tender medium rare inside. The second part is creating a quick pan sauce with the browned bits and a few other ingredients. Unlike a gravy or roux, this sauce is thickened with fat from the meat instead of flour or cornstarch, so it’s extra rich and luscious.

Turn Steak Au Poivre into a romantic steakhouse dinner with side dishes like Morton’s Creamed Spinach and Mashed Potatoes. Another classic side for this steak dinner is Pommes Frites, also known as Shoestring French Fries. They are light and crispy, with just the right amount of oil, and perfect for dipping in leftover Au Poivre sauce.


Preparation

Step 1

Rub steaks all over with 1 Tbsp. oil and season generously with salt. Heat 2 Tbsp. oil and 1 Tbsp. butter in a medium saucepan over medium-low. Cook shallot, stirring often, until golden brown, 10–15 minutes. Remove from heat and carefully add ¼ cup cognac. Bring mixture to a simmer over medium-low heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until cognac is reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Stir in cream and black pepper and bring to a simmer. Cook, swirling occasionally, until cream is slightly thickened, about 5 minutes let cool slightly.

Step 2

Transfer mixture to a blender and blend until smooth (or use an immersion blender directly in the pot). Add green peppercorns and pulse just to break up (do not blend completely). Return pepper sauce to saucepan season with salt. Cover and set aside.

Step 3

Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a large cast-iron skillet over high. Add steaks and cook, occasionally lifting steaks to allow hot oil to flow underneath, until a brown crust forms underneath, about 4 minutes. Turn steaks and cook until crust forms on the other side and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers 125° for medium-rare, about 4 minutes. Transfer steaks to a cutting board and let rest 10 minutes. Reserve skillet.

Step 4

Pour off all but 2 Tbsp. fat from skillet and return to medium-high heat. Place steaks, garlic, rosemary, and remaining 2 Tbsp. butter in skillet and cook, basting steaks with butter and turning halfway through, until butter is very fragrant and golden brown, about 1 minute. Increase heat to high. Lean safely away from pan, add remaining 2 Tbsp. cognac, and immediately tilt skillet toward flame to ignite cognac (if you have an electric stove or cognac doesn’t ignite, it’s okay). Cook, carefully shaking skillet, until flames die out, about 30 seconds. Transfer steaks back to cutting board and let rest 10 minutes.

Step 5

While the steaks are resting, reheat pepper sauce over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until warmed through.

Step 6

Slice steak and spoon pepper sauce over top. Garnish with more rosemary sprigs if desired.


    1. Preheat oven to 200°F.
    2. Pat steaks dry and season both sides with kosher salt.
    3. Coarsely crush peppercorns in a sealed plastic bag with a meat pounder or bottom of a heavy skillet, then press pepper evenly onto both sides of steaks.
    4. Heat a 12-inch heavy skillet (preferably cast-iron) over moderately high heat until hot, about 3 minutes, then add oil, swirling skillet, and sauté steaks in 2 batches, turning over once, about 6 minutes per batch for medium-rare.
    5. Transfer steaks as cooked to a heatproof platter and keep warm in oven while making sauce.
    6. Pour off fat from skillet, then add shallots and half of butter (2 tablespoons) to skillet and cook over moderately low heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits, until shallots are well-browned all over, 3 to 5 minutes.
    7. Add Cognac (use caution it may ignite) and boil, stirring, until liquid is reduced to a glaze, 2 to 3 minutes. Add cream and any meat juices accumulated on platter and boil sauce, stirring occasionally, until reduced by half, 3 to 5 minutes. Add remaining 2 tablespoons butter and cook over low heat, swirling skillet, until butter is incorporated. Serve sauce with steaks.

    Honestly, I feel like a dingaling that I was "this many" years old before learning that steak au poivre, one of my favorite childhood restaurant dishes, was a simple pan sauce. This recipe is perfection, and so easy. Happy to have this easy weeknight dinner in the repertoire now!

    Why mess with perfection, particularly when it's so simple? I can't believe Iɽ never tried to make this before - it was a dish I fell in love with as a child. I wouldn't call what I did modifications so much as adapting the recipe to what I had on hand: I used a touch less butter than the recipe called for out of sheer laziness - I just used what Iɽ already had in the freezer in lumps of varying sizes. And I sautéed the steaks without adding any oil to the cast iron pan - it was seasoned enough. I finely chopped one small shallot and did not measure that, but it wasn't more than 1/2 cup. And I used 4 top sirloin steaks of about 4 - 5 oz each. Otherwise, I followed the recipe exactly. Weeknight steak au poive, where have you been all my life and how did I get to this many years without cooking you?

    Absolutely outstanding. I followed it as much as I could. Yes, I used salted butter and no scallion so finely chopped an onion were my subs. Turned out so good! Made smashed parm. potatoes and roasted brussels, so so good!

    Absolutely flawless and delicious as long as you follow it to a T. Make sure to use unsalted butter. Learned my lesson the first time, but still good. Way better the second time. I used Christian Bro’s. VS both times. Literally one of the best meals you can make. and if you do the steak portion for 2 and make the sauce for 4, you have awesome sauce for frites.

    Simply perfect. Made using filet mignon and served with roasted potato wedges and asparagus. Obviously, the cook on the meat matters, but this sauce is ridiculously awesome. All the fancy "twists" over the years just don't measure up to this pretty classic version.

    I was looking for a quick recipe (30 min before I was supposed to serve dinner) and thought I would take a chance. My girlfriend said this was the best steak I have ever made. I'll play around with it in the future but for now its perfect!