New recipes

Mood-Boosting Foods (Slideshow)


Pro tips: Eat oily fish, and stay positive

Taking Positive Steps

During a depressive episode, losing interest in those things you used to enjoy, and feeling hopeless and that life isn’t worth living are all very common. It’s hard to take positive action when feeling this way, but people do try what is within their power to boost their mood. However, while the likes of alcohol and drugs might seem a guaranteed way to lift your spirits, in the longer term they can actually make problems with depression worse.

Seeking professional help is a must when you have depression, particularly if it is more than just a mild case, as effective medications and talking therapies are available to help. However, the beneficial effects of diet, exercise, getting enough sleep and spending time outdoors shouldn't be underestimated.

Start with Oily Fish

Making changes is hard at the best of times — even more so when you are depressed — but taking small steps one by one can make all the difference. It can be as simple as incorporating specific foods known to enhance mood into your diet on a regular basis. One great food to start with is oily fish. While the likes of salmon, sardines, mackerel, fresh tuna, herrings, and anchovies might not make it onto your plate very often, making an effort to include these nutrient-rich fish into your diet at least weekly is a must. So why are these fish good for your mood?

Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

It seems there isn’t a week that goes by without a story relating to these essential fatty acids; they’re so called as our bodies cannot make them, so it is essential we obtain them from our diet. They have long been known to protect the heart and circulation, but their range of benefits is now growing.

Omega-3 oils are found in high concentrations within the brain, so it’s no surprise that we need a regular supply. There is evidence that these fatty acids benefit everything from our memory and mental ability to our behavior, not to mention how we feel.

Various studies have demonstrated that increasing intake of omega-3 helps in the management of depression, including specific types, such as postnatal depression and bipolar disorder. While specific guidelines for intake of omega-3 for depression have not been established, as a minimum we should all be following guidelines for 8-ounce fish weekly — that includes some oily fish. Anyone with depression would no doubt benefit from more, but including it weekly would be a great start. If you prefer not to eat oily fish or are unable to, omega-3 can be sourced from supplements – including those from algae that are suitable for vegetarians — or from plant sources, such as canola, walnut, and flaxseed oil.

A Source of Vitamin D

Although vitamin D is usually associated with bone health, this is another nutrient that is now understood to have a much wider role. The link between a deficiency of this vitamin and depression has been studied, and a recent review of the evidence, which was published earlier this year in the British Journal of Psychiatry, demonstrated that there is a significant association between the two, highlighting the need for more research on whether supplementing the diet with vitamin D is beneficial for depression.

While the best way to meet your needs for vitamin D is through the action of sunlight on your skin, in more northerly latitudes, this is only possible between April and September. As there are few foods rich in vitamin D — besides oily fish, only egg yolk, liver, and fortified foods likebreakfast cereals, margarine, and milk contain the vitamin — meeting your needs can be more of a problem during the fall and winter. While some people — such as the under-fives, pregnant and breast-feeding women, seniors, and anyone who is housebound or covers their skin when they go out — still benefit from a supplement to be sure their requirements are met, putting oily fish on your weekly menu is a good step for the rest of us.

A Boost to Selenium Intake

This mineral might not be so well publicized, but selenium is another nutrient that can benefit your mental health, and oily fish is one of the best sources. A number of studies has suggested that low levels of selenium in the diet are associated with depression, which may relate to its function as an antioxidant in helping to protect the brain cells and maintain favorable conditions. When selenium supplements have been taken, this has been shown to be effective at preventing postnatal depression.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


7 Foods to Boost Your Mood

Feeling blue&mdashor maybe just a little blah? Your diet could be partly to blame. Research shows getting the right nutrients over time can improve your mood, tame stress, ease anxiety and even help fight depression. Now that's something to smile about.

Talk about food for thought. Growing research shows that simply making changes in what you eat can significantly boost mood and improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

In a recent clinical study known as the SMILES trial, researchers split nearly 70 people-all diagnosed with depression, and all on poor diets-into two groups. The first group had no form of therapy but switched to a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, low-fat dairy, fish, eggs, seeds and nuts. The second group met regularly with a support group and continued to chow down on sweets, processed deli meats and salty snacks.

After three months, the healthy eaters showed fewer symptoms of depression than the second group. In fact, more than a third of them no longer even met the criteria for being depressed.

Want to see what the right foods can do for your mood and mental health? The seven foods below have all been shown to help ease stress, improve mood, relieve anxiety or help fight depression. See what a difference they can make for you.

1. Chocolate

Pictured Recipe: Mug Brownie

Finally, science backs up what many of us already know: chocolate does make you happy. In a study done at the Nestlé Research Center in Switzerland, researchers found that eating a little dark chocolate (1.4 ounces of it, to be exact) every day for two weeks reduced the levels of cortisol and other stress hormones in people who were highly stressed. Experts say it could be thanks to the antioxidants found in dark chocolate. So go ahead! Indulge. Just be sure to account for the 200-plus calories in that tasty chunk of chocolate-or you may soon start stressing over extra pounds.

2. Salmon

Good news for worrywarts: Regularly eating salmon-and mackerel, tuna, herring and other fatty fish-can help lower anxiety, research shows. Experts say it&aposs because of their omega-3 fatty acids, a key mood-boosting nutrient and one our bodies don&apost produce. Omega-3s alter brain chemicals linked with mood-specifically dopamine and serotonin. In one randomized, controlled study, medical students who took omega-3 supplements before an exam reduced their anxiety symptoms by as much as 20 percent.

3. Green Tea

Pictured Recipe: Matcha Green Tea Latte

On a bad day, sipping a cup of tea can be just the thing to soothe your senses, calm your nerves and brighten a dark mood. Make that green tea and you may reap even more benefits, researchers say. According to a Japanese study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking two to three cups of green tea a day was linked to reduced depression symptoms in elderly people. That may be due to a number of mood-boosting nutrients, including L-theanine, an amino acid that helps fight anxiety. Green tea also has some caffeine-enough for a pick-me-up when you&aposre feeling down, but not enough to give you the jitters.

4. Oysters

Sure, oysters have a reputation as an aphrodisiac. But their mood-boosting benefits go well beyond the bedroom. Oysters are high in zinc, a nutrient that helps ease anxiety. Zinc also helps improve sleep quality, essential for staying on an even keel. Bonus: Once you get the hang of it, eating oysters can be fun-and an instant mood-lifter in itself.

Not into seafood? Get your zinc fix with cashews, eggs, liver or beef.

5. Blueberries

Pictured Recipe: Purple Fruit Salad

With more antioxidants than any other common fruit or vegetable, blueberries deliver a bushel of brain-boosting benefits. Thanks mostly to a type of antioxidant called flavonoids, blueberries help regulate mood, improve memory and protect the brain from aging. And some experts say they may do even more. One recent animal study suggests the anti-inflammatory chemicals in blueberries may be helpful in treating PTSD and other serious mental health problems.

6. Spinach & Other Leafy Greens

Nearly half of all Americans don&apost get enough magnesium, a mineral that, among other things, helps reduce anxiety. Dark leafy greens like spinach and Swiss chard are loaded with it-so eating them is an easy way to get your daily vegetables and boost your brain health, too. More good sources: beans and lentils, almonds and avocados.

7. Yogurt & Other Probiotics

Pictured Recipe: Rainbow Yogurt Bowl

There&aposs lots of buzz these days about probiotics-fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi and sauerkraut that help keep your gut bacteria in check. Recent studies in both animals and humans suggest links between balanced gut bacteria and better mood, less stress and anxiety, and lower risk of depression.

Still, some experts caution that it&aposs too soon to tell for sure. A recent review of 10 small but solid studies found that eating probiotics for depression and anxiety seemed to help some folks, but not others. The bottom line? Slurping a refreshing yogurt smoothie now and then won&apost hurt your moods-and it may help.


Watch the video: Depression überwinden 5 Tipps um Depressionen zu bekämpfen SOFORTHILFE (January 2022).