New recipes

This Fascinating Infographic Compares Fast Food Portion Sizes Around the World


These charts show how fast food meals stack up around the globe, in both size and calorie count

McDonald's is just one of the fast food joints featured in this infographic.

Ever try fast food abroad? If you have, there are probably a few things you noticed. On one hand, as we’ve shown, there are some crazy foods abroad that we in the states have never tried, seen, or even heard about in some cases. Different tastes in different countries leads to different menu items.

On the other hand, many orders are remarkably standardized around the world. A Big Mac in China looks an awful lot like an American Big Mac, and fries at almost every chain are basically uniform across the board.

Or are they?

As this interesting infographic from CompareTheMarket and Builtvisible shows, all fast foods are not created equal — even if they look alike and are called the same thing. The reason is portion size. Take the first section at the top featuring comparisons of KFC’s original recipe sandwich. At 139 grams in weight (and 411 calories), Japan clearly has the one of the smallest versions in the world. The next largest is Australia, at 181 grams. Oddly, although this Aussie sandwich is 42 grams bigger, it actually has 13 fewer calories than Japan’s.

Looking at McDonald’s, the opposite is true, as Japan actually has the largest medium-sized fries. At Burger King (aka Hungry Jack, the name used in Australia), Japan’s Whopper is the second smallest — 12 grams smaller than Canada, home of the largest burger — yet still contains 80 more calories than the version served by our neighbors to the north.

The infographic also contains comparisons for Subway, Krispy Kreme, and Boost Juice.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.


Is Home-Cooked Food Cheaper Than Fast Food? Yes.

The fast food meal of two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries and two medium, and two small sodas: $27.89. The home-cooked meal of chicken, salad, potatoes, and milk: $13.78. A homemade meal of pinto beans and rice is even cheaper at $9.26.

In the info-graphic's accompanying article by Mark Bittman goes on to bust the myth of the more affordable fast food meal. Besides the argument that a person's dollar goes further in terms of quantity when purchasing fast food, Bittman addresses the idea that junk food is necessary because it gives a person more calories for their buck. "Given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few," Bittman argues, "measuring food's value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink's value by its alcoholic content." A home-cooked meal is not only cheaper than its fast food counterpart it can also provide an equal amount of calories - many of which are of the healthy variety.

But just because people can afford to buy wholesome ingredients rather than a pre-cooked fast food meal doesn't mean they can cook with them. Bittman acknowledges that it's going to take some work for America to become a country of home cooks. "Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating - roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad - must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley," Bittman asserts. "The smart campaign is not to get McDonald's to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life." We agree with Bittman and have rounded up some of our best easy recipe collections to inspire budding home cooks.