New recipes

Chocolatier Makes it Possible to Snort Chocolate Like Cocaine

Chocolatier Makes it Possible to Snort Chocolate Like Cocaine


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

A Belgian chocolate maker is encouraging people to snort chocolate

Dominique Persoone's "Chocolate Shooter" allows a person to snort chocolate like cocaine.

For all the people out there who love chocolate but feel that mouths are too slow to be an effective conveyance for it, Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone has invented a cool new device that could make things better by allowing people to shoot cocoa right up their noses.

According to Reuters, Persoone created a system for snorting chocolate like cocaine in 2007 for a Rolling Stones party. The “Chocolate Shooter” is modeled after a device Persoone’s grandfather reportedly used to shoot snuff up his nose, and somehow it has caught on as a culinary novelty. Since the Rolling Stone party in 2007, Persoone says he has sold more than 25,000 Chocolate Shooters at about $50 apiece.

The device is like a tiny, clear plastic catapult that one loads with chocolate powder flavored with either mint and ginger or mint and raspberry. Persoone says he developed the chocolate powders after first trying plain cocoa powder and finding it to be too dry to comfortably shoot up one’s nose.

“The mint and the ginger really tickle your nose,” he said. “Then the mint flavor goes down and the chocolate stays in your brain.”

It took some experimenting to get to the ginger mint profile, and there were some setbacks. At one point, Persoone thought a chili chocolate would be a good idea, so he added chili powder. According to Persoone it tturns out shooting chili powder up one’s nose is “a very bad idea.”


Snorting Chocolate Is the Newest Trend, and It’s Kinda Scary

Cocoa powder. Commonly found in your favorite brownie recipe, alcoholic hot chocolate, and now – in people’s nostrils? The hell? Sure, the days of snorting cocaine and other powdered drugs may be far from over, but the alternative that many users have switched to is kind of alarming.

A handful of European clubs are starting to offer cacao powder at their rave parties, in various forms including drink, pill, or powder. The idea is that all of these chocolate products substitute drugs and other harmful substances that may be consumed in similar settings with strobe lights, loud music, and an excess amount of people. One club in particular, Alchemy Eros, states that they’re not necessarily ‘anti’ anything – it’s just an alternative that they’re experimenting with.

Dominique Persoone, a Belgian chocolatier, has even invented a device (dubbed “the Shooter”) that facilitates the snorting of cocoa powder. His premise is largely the same: the experimentation of different products that are typically used in the kitchen, and motivating others to explore what they can sniff in the kitchen. To him, smell is a very important component of enjoying food – but we’d much prefer to get a whiff of our food without inhaling anything solid.

But does it really get you high? If anything, it’s a different sense of the word – the endorphins in the chocolate induce feelings of euphoria that pair with the loud, raging music, and the magnesium relaxes tense muscles. And even then, it could really be a placebo effect, where people are simply believing that they are achieving a high, when they actually aren’t. At the very core, the main effect you could get is a relatively strong burst of energy.

Either way, the side effects that come with cocaine are absent when it comes to snorting chocolate, though we don’t recommend trying it until more research has been done and proven. Or, like, ever. In the meantime, be more strategic with your chocolate and use it in these recipes. Actually, just eat it straight up, because why not?


Is Snorting Cocoa Powder Safe?

Dominique Persoone recently introduced the "chocolate shooter," a catapult-like device that propels small amounts of cocoa powder and other spices into your nose.

"You load it like a gun, putting very little chocolate mix on the machine … Then, you push, and pfffff! The chocolate blows in your nose," Persoone told Live Science.

Persoone says that sniffing cocoa powder is "another way of tasting it," because of the nose's superior ability to detect flavors and scents.

But before you go out and do a line of cocoa powder (which you should not), listen to doctors who say that snorting any kind of powder is risky, even in small amounts.

"Snorting chocolate powder is not safe, because the powder is perceived by the nose as a foreign toxic substance," said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

The powder can damage the microscopic hairs, or cilia, and membranes of the nose, causing problems with their ability to work correctly, as well as possible scarring, Josephson told Live Science in an email. It is not safe to snort any powder, he added. "Putting any foreign bodies -- including smoke, cocaine and/or chocolate powder -- is not safe and is not advised," he said.


The chocolate snorting kit

The Chocolate Line store in Antwerp sells kits for the act, complete with the plastic catapult, instructions and a warning against excessive sniffing.

Shops in Canada are already selling it. "Sniffs" of chocolate cost $2 each, and the owner of Commercial Drive Licorice Parlor in Vancouver, B.C. says that at least 60 people have come in to try it.

"The chocolate goes up your nose and settles into your sinuses and oral factory where most of your tasting happens," Mary Jean Dunsdon told HuffPost Canada. "Then you just kind of experience chocolate for a couple hours, actually, in a very subtle manner . It hits all the same pleasure receptors in the brain [as it would] if you were to eat chocolate."


Snorting Chocolate is the Future of Culinary Decadence

Photo courtesy of www.chocolateshooter.be

Why just put your chocolate in your mouth like some common Cadbury-egg-scarfing slob, when there are plenty of other orifices you could be cramming it into?

In a trend giving a whole new meaning to the expression “brown-noser,” pleasure-mongering foodies are now snorting chocolate like it’s cocaine. Back in 2007, Dominique Persoone, a Belgian chocolatier, invented a device to shoot chocolate into a user’s nostrils, basing its design on Victorian gadgets made for snuff tobacco. The idea was originally a gag at a party for the Rolling Stones, a culinary commentary on the band’s hard-partying history, but since then the practice has been picking up steam—Persoone claims to have sold more than 25,000 of his little chocolate launchers.

“You load it like a gun,” Persoone told Live Science, “putting very little chocolate mix on the machine…Then, you push, and pfffff! The chocolate blows in your nose.” While snorting lines of pricey Ecuadorian cocoa might sound like the kind of decadent frivolity you’d have found in, say, the harems of Montezuma, or the French aristocracy right before the revolution, doing crazy things with chocolate is just business as usual in Belgium. Remember, this is the country that brought us a 111-foot-long chocolate model train, chocolate-flavored postage stamps, and the ever-charming edible chocolate anus. And besides, according to Live Science, Persoone might be on to something here:

Usually, when people taste something on their tongue, they can detect only a few flavors, including sweet, salty, bitter, sour and umami (savory). In contrast, the human nose can detect more than 1 trillion different scents. Sniffing chocolate is “another way of tasting it,” Persoone said.

Alas, experts warn that as fun as doing rails of cocoa might sound, snorting chocolate might not actually be very good for you. “Snorting chocolate powder is not safe, because the powder is perceived by the nose as a foreign toxic substance,” Dr. Jordan Josephson, of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York said to Live Science.

The powder can damage the microscopic hairs, or cilia, and membranes of the nose, causing problems with their ability to work correctly, as well as possible scarring, Josephson told Live Science in an email. It is not safe to snort any powder, he added. “Putting any foreign bodies—including smoke, cocaine and/or chocolate powder—is not safe and is not advised," he said.

The chocolatier’s claims that using the shooter gets one “high on chocolate,” and induces an experience similar to “after an orgasm” are also suspect, according to Josephson. But Persoone dismisses these criticisms, saying haters just aren’t getting the good stuff. Per Live Science:

Persoone emphasized that the chocolate being snorted has to be pure cocoa. "You can't just start sniffing Nesquik," he said. However, some of his friends have used his machine to snort other types of food. For example, some snort dried basil before eating a tomato mozzarella salad.


So We’re Really Snorting Chocolate. Okay, Let’s Hear About it.

Chances are, you’ve heard of a delicious new club drug hitting party cities all over the world. It’s chocolate, it’s inhaled through one’s nose, and yes, snorting chocolate will definitely get you high. What kind of high, you ask? Portland’s Willamette Week rolled up a hundred-dollar bill to find out.

First, the science behind the high: raw cacao, which chocolate is derived from, contains endorphins and a kind of dopamine called tyrosine. Get a concentrated amount of those two chemicals in your system as quickly as possible, and reap the benefits of euphoria, an energy boost and increased mental clarity. Snorting something delivers its chemicals swiftly to your brain and bloodstream, which is why folks are snorting these powdered chocolate products. Why not inject them? Because that would make you a literal chocoholic, and also probably kill you.

Snorting chocolate is a little out of the ordinary, and possibly unwise, but that didn’t prevent writer Matthew Korfhage from penning a thorough review of an extra-caffeinated variety called Coco Loko (hear him out!)

“It’s been ground into a pleasingly soft, fine dust whose mild discomfort comes only after the snort — a mix of viscous, chocolate cake-y post-nasal drip and the world’s least-offensive brown boogers.” Gross, yet interesting! He goes on to and describe how the sensation compares to snorting Pixie Sticks — again, a well-researched piece — and his overall assessment of the whole thing.

Approached this way, inhalable chocolate doesn’t sound as dangerous as critics make it out to be however, it’s not actually the chocolate itself they’re railing against. They know that would make them look like evil robots. Vocal opponent NY Senator Chuck Schumer referred to these new products as “cocaine on training wheels,” which is hard to argue with, given that New York City alone consumes more than 16 tons of the illegal drug each year.

Still, dedicated chocolate fans probably view this curious dessert/drug as the holy grail of sugar rushes, so don’t expect it to go the way of the “original” Four Loko.


An Odd Invention May Be Fueling This Strange Behavior

A renowned Belgian chocolatier, Dominique Persoone is hailed for creating a contraption called a “Chocolate Shooter” that enables users to snort cocoa powder. According to Mr. Persoone’s business’ website, this device was created for and introduced at The Rolling Stones birthday party, and has since soared in production, with 25,000 units sold throughout the world.

About an eighth of a teaspoon of the accompanying product, termed “cocoa snuff powder,” is loaded onto a tiny spoon, which is essentially like a catapult that fires the powder into your nostrils. These chocolate mixtures are actually mixed with other food items—raspberry, mint, and ginger—to enhance the flavor experience. Due to the nose’s finite ability to pick up on innumerable scents, Mr. Persoone claims “sniffing chocolate is “another way of tasting it,” as reported by Live Science. Persoone did caution people not to snort cocoa or chocolate they have at home, citing that it is too dry and may become “like a chocolate jellyfish in your nose.”


Line of Cocoa: Is Chocolate Snorting Safe?

In a bizarre new trend in certain circles, people are snorting chocolate powder through their noses with the aid of a machine. But some experts say the practice may be dangerous and that people should not snort any type of powder.

The man behind the "chocolate shooter" is Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone. His company, The Chocolate Line, makes a device that is basically a tiny catapult, with two small, spring-loaded spoons that fling cocoa powder into the nostrils.

"You load it like a gun, putting very little chocolate mix on the machine … Then, you push, and pfffff! The chocolate blows in your nose," Persoone told Live Science. [7 Sweet Facts About Chocolate]

A hit of cocoa

Usually, when people taste something on their tongue, they can detect only a few flavors, including sweet, salty, bitter, sour and umami (savory). In contrast, the human nose can detect more than 1 trillion different scents. Sniffing chocolate is "another way of tasting it," Persoone said.

The chocolate shooter started off as a joke. Persoone and his colleagues were catering a surprise party for The Rolling Stones, and he designed a dessert involving raspberry and chocolate. But instead of having people eat the chocolate, he decided to have them sniff it. [Watch Persoone demonstrate the chocolate shooter]

Persoone started experimenting with his grandfather's old snuff machine.

"We did some tests sniffing pure chocolate, but it was not strong enough," Persoone said. "Then, we mixed the chocolate with chili pepper — that hurt a lot."

The inventors finally settled on a mixture of dry mint, ginger and chocolate, and went to a hardware store for the materials to build their own chocolate-snorting machine.

Before long, Persoone said, "everybody wanted to have that machine." In the 10 years since that time, his company has sold more than 25,000 of the devices to people all over the world, he said.

Safe to snort?

"Snorting chocolate powder is not safe, because the powder is perceived by the nose as a foreign toxic substance," said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

The powder can damage the microscopic hairs, or cilia, and membranes of the nose, causing problems with their ability to work correctly, as well as possible scarring, Josephson told Live Science in an email. It is not safe to snort any powder, he added. "Putting any foreign bodies — including smoke, cocaine and/or chocolate powder — is not safe and is not advised," he said.

The chocolate shooter comes with a warning in the box to not sniff too much, Persoone said. And he doesn't recommend letting children use the device.

If a person snorts chocolate, how does it affect the brain?

Persoone claimed that consuming chocolate releases chemicals in the brain that produce feelings similar to those "after an orgasm."

But Josephson said there is no science-based evidence that snorting chocolate can give you a high, he said.

Persoone emphasized that the chocolate being snorted has to be pure cocoa. "You can't just start sniffing Nesquik," he said. However, some of his friends have used his machine to snort other types of food. For example, some snort dried basil before eating a tomato mozzarella salad.

But Josephson isn't convinced. "I do not advise snorting any powder products," he said. "I recommend eating mints or basil and chocolate, and getting the desired effects the old-fashioned way."

Copyright 2015 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


The Party Drug That Will Give You a Sweet High

Hundreds of people are packed into a bumping basement club in downtown Berlin, dancing for hours on end in a free-wheeling rave. The substance of choice hails from the exotic tropics. It’s said to impart a brain-boosting rush and tons of energy, enough to transform its users into raging Energizer bunnies. This drug can be ingested, drunk and even snorted. You’re probably familiar with its common name: cacao.

Say, um, “hi” to the sweetest party drug there is. In recent months, cacao has transcended its already lofty status as a superfood and vaulted into the realm of party drugs. In this latest incarnation, cacao powder is taking the place of alcohol and illicit substances like Molly and ecstasy in parts of Western Europe. Lucid, a monthly cacao-fueled dance party in Berlin, fixes bitter Balinese cacao into partygoers’ drinks. Morning Gloryville, a rise-and-shine rave company that organizes dance parties from London to New York, stocks its bar with cacao drinks and cacao pills. And in perhaps the strangest form, Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone invented a special $50 snorting device so you can huff your chocolate in powdered form, much like cocaine.

Never mind that this is the same raw powder you can find at the corner Vitamin Shoppe or processed in your favorite candy bar — or that cacao is perfectly legal in all the jurisdictions we found. Proponents say that raw, virgin cacao is far more potent than you ever imagined. First comes a surge of endorphins into your bloodstream, which increases acuity and fuels you with feelings of euphoria. Then there’s the flood of magnesium, which relaxes your muscles and de-tenses your body. Raw cacao is also chock-full of flavanols that increase blood circulation and stimulate brain power, according to a recent study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone snorts cocoa powder off his Chocolate Shooter.

And, of course, cacao can be downright delicious. Lucid’s pixie-like party organizer, Ruby May, isn’t a purist when it comes to the stuff: She spikes the 18 pounds of cacao per party with sweet hints of honey, agave syrup and cinnamon, and the celebrations go on for six hours. “It’s like a smooth, sensual hug in a cup,” says the 36-year old. And as far as the sniffing chocolate goes, Persoone mixes the powder with ginger, raspberry and mint for his patrons in Belgium. Chili pepper was tried, he says, but was “not a good idea.” Color us surprised.

To be clear, cacao is not going to distort your reality. Under the beats of house, hip-hop, funk and electronic music, cacao “amplifies” the experience, rather than dims it with alcohol or drugs, says May. In fact, she doesn’t allow booze inside. The mood-boosting effects of cacao are “subtle,” she says, and it’s not like tripping on acid. Even pure cacao is not actually a drug. While it does contain certain mood-enhancing compounds such as anandamide and phenylethylamine, the bitter reality is that the amount is much too low to have any direct influence on mood, says Dr. Catherine Kwik-Uribe, the director of research and development for Mars Symbioscience, a scientific division of Mars, Incorporated. Which is to say that all of this alleged chocoholism is probably a placebo effect.

If it sounds like G-rated fun, well, it is these are parties where virtue handily wins over vice.

All of these concoctions come courtesy of the “conscious dance movement,” which evolved from an underground movement into morning raves and lunchtime dance parties, often attended by millennial office workers. It seeks to create a positive — and healthy — environment, in which participants can unhinge themselves from negative thoughts and social inhibitions. Alcohol is usually a no-no, as are illegal drugs. Self-actualization, communal bonding and calorie-burning are key. If it sounds like G-rated fun, well, it is these are parties where virtue handily wins over vice. (Indeed, a kindergartner’s birthday party, with ice cream and cake, hits more deadly sins than this.)

But such events have found an audience. One of Lucid’s attendees was 51-year-old Réka Komáromi, an ethnobotanist based in Canterbury. She says the raves help her to overcome the sorrow of her daughter’s untimely cancer — to “get rid of the sadness” and “allow me to access my anger.” Now that she’s fully steeped into this scene, she can’t get enough of cacao or its mellowing effects, especially for such “psychologically hard” times in her life.

The use of cacao was pioneered in millennia past by Mesoamerican civilizations. As early as 1900 B.C., archaeologists believe, the Mokaya people in what is now Mexico were fermenting cacao beans into liquid chocolate. The Aztecs, it seems, valued cacao so highly they would trade the beans as a form of currency. Today, the very ethically conscious may have a beef with chocolate, protesting that appropriating cacao from its Mexican origins for Eurotrash-like dance parties rings a wee bit colonial.

Skepticism aside, cacao can act as a “catalyst for having more life,” says May, rather than “numbing ourselves with beer.” And “in all my years in research, I have never seen a person not smile when enjoying a piece of chocolate,” adds Kwik-Uribe. Admittedly, she has a vested interest — but on the other hand, we can’t imagine a party that can’t be improved by chocolate.


I tried sniffing cocoa to get high on a night out and it was surprisingly good

Health-conscious clubbers across Europe are ditching cocaine for cocoa, in order to get high.

The cocoa craze, which apparently originated in Berlin, has spread across the continent with health rave organisers such as Morning Gloryville selling cocoa pills at their parties. Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone has even invented a chocolate shooter, specifically designed for shooting chocolate up your nostrils.

Cocoa it seems is the new, cheaper and healthier drug of choice. But is it better? I spent my Saturday night snorting cocoa in club toilets to find out.

Experts like Persoone recommend using Peruvian or Dominican cocoa mixed with mint and ginger for the perfect blend of intensity and texture. Unfortunately, my local supermarket had a limited range of cocoa powder and I only had a choice between Bournville cocoa powder and Green and Black’s Organic version. I chose the medium sized tub of Bournville cocoa for just under £3. If it genuinely does get you high, it’s by the far the cheapest and most easily obtainable drug available.

Unable to justify the €45 price tag of one of Persoone’s chocolate shooters, I opted for more traditional methods of admission: keys, rolled up bank notes and a baggie. Unsure of how much I would need, but estimating that it probably takes more cocoa than cocaine to give you a buzz, I filled the baggie to the top. So far the cocoa aromas were only making me want to sit in with a mug of hot chocolate in front of Netflix, which wasn’t exactly the intended outcome.

I got dressed and was ready to leave and meet my friends. It was the ideal moment to have my first sniff. According to regular users of cocoa, you should feel a rush of euphoria, similar to that given by cocaine as the cocoa release endorphins into the bloodstream. I rolled up a bank note and snorted a small pile of powder. It was underwhelming. Apart from the tingling in my nose, I felt no different. However, my nostrils were now caked in damp brown powder and my top was stained with cocoa dust. I was not impressed.

I went to meet my friends at the bar. When they started ordering drinks, I shadily excused myself and snuck off to the toilets with my bag of cocoa and key. Disappointed by my initial earlier experience, this time I decided to snort three lines. When the burning in my nostril subsided, I felt a distinct change. The bathroom walls were pulsating with energy. As I stepped back into the bar, the music seemed louder and the lights were brighter. I was seized by the irresistible urge to join strangers’ conversations.

As it got later, we left the bar and headed to the club. I snorted a few more lines before we left and found myself behaving completely out of character: organising and directing everyone to the club. I could feel an intense, weirdly nice throbbing behind my eyes like a heartbeat. Once inside the club I did two more lines, and spluttering cocoa everywhere I told my friends what was behind my peculiar behaviour and avoidance of alcohol tonight. My friend who studies dance thought it was hilarious that I kept trying to imitate her dance moves and at one point I joined a dance off between two strangers. It didn’t seem strange. I felt invincible.

At near 2am, the intense throbbing behind my eyes had developed into a dull headache and I briefly lost my friends. I decided it was time to head home. I left the club and thought nothing of making the two-hour long walk home by myself. The only problem was that I couldn’t stop sneezing lumps of cocoa, which was kind of gross for passers-by.

The next day I felt surprisingly well. I woke up early and unlike my friends who were sat in bed craving sausage rolls I was able to go to work feeling relatively normal, if not a bit spaced out. Even better, I could still remember and relive the buzz from the previous night. Also, there was no regret that my few hours of fun last night were potentially going to cause heart complications in a decade’s time.

The only downside was the messiness. My nostrils were blocked with clumps of cocoa and my pockets were filled with brown dust. I would definitely use cocoa again in the future but more likely as a stimulant rather than as a party drug, by which it is making a name for itself. The powerful concentration and energy it seemed to give me made it more comparable to caffeine or study drug Modafinil.

Potential Placebo effect aside, at less than £3 for a year’s supply, cocoa is definitely worth the hype.


BrewDog and Tony’s Chocolonely are making a raspberry and white chocolate milkshake IPA

When it comes to popular food and drink pairings, white chocolate and pale ale don’t usually come to mind.

But Scottish craft beer maker BrewDog has teamed up with Dutch chocolatier Tony’s Chocolonely for a brand new project.

The two brands are set to bring out a raspberry and white chocolate milkshake IPA.

The brewer’s CEO James Watt teased the latest collaboration back in March, with a picture of a trio of cans featuring the Tony’s Chocolonely logo.

Then last week he tweeted again revealing that the two companies will be joining forces to make the unique drink.

He said: ‘Honoured to be collaborating with one of our all-time favourite companies @TonyChocolonely.

‘Their chocolate is incredible [and] we love their mission to make chocolate 100% slave free.

‘We are going to be making a white chocolate and raspberry milkshake IPA.’

Honoured to be collaborating with one of our all-time favourite companies @TonyChocolonely

Their chocolate is incredible & we love their mission to make chocolate 100% slave free.

We are going to be making a white chocolate & raspberry milkshake IPA. pic.twitter.com/YHu1lqFfTh

— James Watt (@BrewDogJames) April 8, 2021

Tony’s Chocolonely CCO, Henk Jan Beltman, also shared the news on LinkedIn, saying: ‘Let’s make headway together. The honour and pleasure is all ours James Watt.’

Little else is known about the upcoming product, although the pictures of the cans suggest the drink comes in at 4.2% abv.

More: Football

Kai Havertz fires Chelsea to Champions League glory against Manchester City

'The devastation Covid wreaked on care homes will stay with me forever'

Mum of teen who died after drinking strong cider calls for minimum alcohol pricing

It seems like it’s a match made in heaven, too, as both companies are committed to sustainability and are driven to make the food and drink world a more ethical place.

Last year, BrewDog announced the world’s first carbon-negative beer club and over the years the brand has managed to gain support from young people for their forward-thinking projects.

But it looks like there’s another hybrid product that’s set to be big this summer…

Iced coffee popsicles could be the refreshing, caffeinated kick you turn to time and time again over the coming months.


Watch the video: Chocolatiers chocolate snorting device offers new way to cocoa high (February 2023).